Andy Isaacs Announced as This Year’s Beberman Award Winner

October 13, 2016

Congratulations to Andy Isaacs, who was selected to receive the 2016 ICTM Max Beberman Mathematics Educator Award. The list of Beberman Award winners includes the most esteemed mathematics educators in Illinois over the past 45 years, also among them CEMSE’s Zalman Usiskin, who won the award in 1981.

The Beberman Award honors educators in Illinois who have made significant contributions to mathematics education through research, curriculum design, or teacher education. The award was established 1971 in honor of Max Beberman, a long-time mathematics teacher at the University of Illinois’ Laboratory High School and founder, in 1951, of the University of Illinois Committee on School Mathematics (UICSM). Under his leadership UICSM went on to develop courses for middle and high school mathematics based on principles that have since become standard in reform math curricula.

Andy joined the University of Chicago School Mathematics Project (UCSMP) in 1995. An author on the second edition of Everyday Mathematics, he has led the development of all subsequent editions. He is now co-director of CEMSE and Senior Research Associate in the Physical Sciences Division at the University of Chicago.

Engineering for Everyone project launched in Woodlawn Children’s Promise Community

October 1, 2016

UC STEM Ed and the Woodlawn Children’s Promise Community (WCPC) have partnered to bring high-quality engineering education to twenty K-5 teachers and their students across the five WCPC elementary schools in the Woodlawn neighborhood. The teachers have now been selected, and on October 22 they received training and materials to begin teaching their first unit!

The year-long initiative, which is being funded by a grant from the University of Chicago Women’s Board, will provide two units of the research-based Engineering is Elementary curriculum for each participating classroom, as well as intensive professional development, mentoring, and collaboration opportunities for participating teachers, facilitated by UC STEM Ed coaches. The first year of the project will culminate in the spring with an Engineering Expo where students will showcase their engineering projects. For more information, see Bringing Engineering to the WCPC project.

Paper from 'Bringing AP CSP to Students with Learning Differences' project voted best at RESPECT 2016 conference

August 1, 2016

At the RESPECT 2016 conference, attendees voted for the best paper out of the full research papers presented and the winning paper was Computer Science Principles (CSP) and Students With Learning Differences: Expanding Opportunities for a Hidden Underrepresented Group from the Bringing AP CSP to Students with Learning Differences NSF funded project, authored by Sarah Wille, Jeanne Century and Miriam Pike (from Wolcott School, Chicago IL).

To learn more about the Bringing AP CSP to Students with Learning Differences project visit http://outlier.uchicago.edu/outlier/projects/

Magnetar Academy Joins UChicago STEM Education

July 1, 2016

A new partnership between UChicago STEM Education and the Magnetar Capital Foundation will expand access to financial education for high school students.

The Magnetar Capital Foundation, parent organization of the Magnetar Youth Investment Academy, will provide UChicago STEM Education with $5 million over four and a half years to further develop and grow the academy’s high school financial education program.

“With one-third of adults in the United States and two-thirds of adults globally lacking in financial literacy, there is a pressing need to reach more children with consumer and financial literacy before they graduate high school and begin accumulating debt,” said Alec Litowitz, founder and CEO of Magnetar Capital, a leading alternative asset manager. “We look forward to this partnership with UChicago STEM Education making meaningful progress in that important effort.”

“By leveraging the deep experience at the University of Chicago we are expanding our ability to reach more high school students with vital financial education lessons that will benefit them throughout their lives,” said Ross Laser, co-founder and president of Magnetar Capital.

The Magnetar Capital Foundation began the academy five years ago to provide a 30-hour financial education curriculum and teacher training for free to Chicago-area high schools. In that time, the program has reached nearly 6,000 students and expanded from two high schools in the 2011–2012 school year to 50 high schools and 150 classrooms today.

“We are proud to have created a financial literacy curriculum that is field-tested by experienced educators and well-integrated into the classroom. UChicago STEM Education’s expertise in K–12 education will help scale what we have started and fill a need for additional teacher training and student tools,” said David Snyderman, managing partner and global head of fixed income at Magnetar Capital.

“We are excited to work with Magnetar in growing this program,” said Andy Isaacs, UChicago STEM Education’s executive director. “We have a rich history of working with educators and administrators from Chicago and across the country in evaluating and building models and tools that improve precollege education. Through our multiple platforms and broad networks of educators and institutions, we can expand the reach and impact of Magnetar’s program.”

Under the new partnership, UChicago STEM Education will oversee and administer the project, will continue to design, develop and refine a flexible and modern set of tools to enable teachers to deliver robust lessons to students, and will develop a data-rich infrastructure to strengthen and measure implementation, ongoing improvement and growth.

“This partnership highlights the immense impact that UChicago STEM Education has had on K-12 education and educators,” said Rocky Kolb, dean of the Physical Sciences Division. “UChicago STEM Education will use existing relationships with school districts to mutually advance financial education instruction in additional Chicago-area schools and will continue to develop relationships in Chicago and cities across the country to further connect the academy’s work with key financial literacy stakeholders. It builds on UChicago’s long history of instructional excellence, K-12 educational research and development, and service and partnership with the Chicagoland community.”

UChicago STEM Education staff will foster a network of energized and committed teachers to deliver the curriculum, actively participate with staff to refine the curriculum and engage other teachers to expand the program’s reach. The Polsky Center for Entrepreneurship and Innovation will work closely with Magnetar and UChicago STEM Education to ensure the refined curriculum is available to any student or teacher who wishes to use it.

UChicago STEM Education pioneered the Everyday Mathematics curriculum that is used by more than four million students each year in the United States. It will draw upon that experience in scaling educational programs to help develop financial education materials from Magnetar in its next phase of growth.

About the Magnetar Youth Investment Academy

Magnetar Youth Investment Academy is an innovative high school-based financial education program provided for free to more than 150 Chicago high school classrooms that has reached nearly 6,000 teens since its inception in 2011. The Academy’s goal is to provide students, especially those from lower-income communities, with the tools they need to lead financially informed and successful lives. Through classroom learning and hands-on experience, students are prepped to make financial decisions throughout their lifetime with money management skills including budgeting, credit, saving and investing. http://www.magnetaracademy.org

VLC Research article in August 2016 issue of Teaching and Teacher Education

May 9, 2016

CEMSE researchers Meg Bates, Lena Phelan, and Cheryl Moran have an article forthcoming in the August 2016 issue of Teaching and Teacher Education. Entitled, If You Build It, Will They Reflect?, the paper looks at the ways teachers made use of an online video-based learning website, addressing the little studied question of what teachers actually learn from using professional development websites.

Research shows that online professional development can be as effective as live video-based professional development, and with the scaling possibilities opened up by online posting, it is a tool that clearly should be developed. Research shows at the same time, however, that facilitation is key to the effectiveness of the live sessions. Real-time facilitators are able to highlight key issues, focus discussion, and probe participants’ thinking, all of which can play a role enhancing teacher learning.

It is thus of critical important to understand how teachers interact with what the authors term “online video-based learning” (OVBL) resources to find out whether professional development activities change in the translation to the online space and whether they need to be adapted or reconstructed to remain effective. Building on previous CEMSE research (Schleppenbach and Beer 2012) showing that teachers were more likely to select video resources designed to support classroom management than interact with materials in ways that promote reflection about practice, the new article seeks to supply precise answers the questions: What do teachers select to view? How do they respond to what they view? And what kinds of videos are best at promoting reflection?

The study draws on data tracking use patterns of 37,000 members of the Everyday Mathematics Virtual Learning Community, an online space hosting extensive OVBL resources, developed and maintained by university-based researchers for teachers to view and share resources designed to support mathematics teaching, allow teachers to communicate with other teachers about pedagogy, and encourage them to take time to reflect on their practice.

The authors learned that left to their own choosing, teachers do tend to view videos that are immediately practical in terms of classroom management, confirming expectations based on the earlier findings. Nevertheless, the current findings also suggest that teachers are reflective to some extent about the videos they do choose to watch, indicating that innovative online video resources that are carefully curated should be able to help teachers avoid less productive video viewing habits and promote enhanced levels of reflectivity.

For the online preprint of the article, please click here.

Early Childhood STEM Working Group Invited to Participate in White House Early Learning STEM Symposium

April 13, 2016

The C-STEMEC Early Childhood STEM Working Group has been invited to participate in the upcoming White House Early Learning STEM Symposium, which will be held April 21. Debbie Leslie will be attending as the Working Group representative.

The Early Childhood STEM Working Group was organized by CEMSE in 2015, in collaboration with the Mathematics Collaborative at the Erikson Institute. Supported by the Chicago Community Trust, the goal of the working group is to pool knowledge about the development of STEM concepts and skills during early childhood years, discuss ways to support early STEM education, and produce usable summaries and recommendations for the field. CEMSE participants, in addition to Debbie, include Liesje Spaepen, Gudelia Lopez, and Marty Gartzman. The Working Group is funded as part of the C-STEMEC grant, which Mike Lach oversees.

Building on the President’s early learning and “Educate to Innovate” agendas, the White House Symposium aims to sharpen the focus on STEM experiences by identifying the research areas, best practices, and education technologies needed to make early STEM education available to our youngest learners and support the parents and caregivers, educators, and community leaders responsible for providing it.

For more information on the Symposium go to: https://www.whitehouse.gov/blog/2016/03/01/supporting-our-youngest-innovators-stem-starts-early

Martin Gartzman Named Chair of NCTM Emerging Issues Committee

May 6, 2016

Martin Gartzman has been named chair of the Emerging Issues Committee (EIC) at the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM). The EIC advises the NCTM board on a range of critical issues related to mathematics education, working to promote and support initiatives that advance NCTM’s strategic priorities. The Committee is charged with enhancing NCTM’s communications with teachers and other stakeholders in education, including the general public, and it acts a liaison between the NCTM and the policy, professional, government, and business communities.

Marty has been Executive Director of CEMSE since 2011, and a member of the EIC since 2014. He will serve a two-year term as EIC chair, through April 2018.

CEMSE’s Zalman Usiskin to Address the Metropolitan Mathematics Club on May 13, 2016

April 29, 2016

Zalman Usiskin, director of the University of Chicago School Mathematics Project, will address the Metropolitan Mathematics Club of Chicago, delivering the talk, The Real Big Ten: The Toughest Mathematical Ideas for High School Students to Learn and How to Approach Them. The talk will take place on May 13, 2016 at the Fountain Blue Banquets & Convention Center in Des Plaines, Illinois.

Noting that some ideas can be notoriously difficult for students to understand, Zal will share insights and strategies that can make teaching more effective. Ranging from algebra to geometry to precalculus, he will elucidate ten difficult concepts in an address that is certain to be as entertaining as it is informative and inspiring, and should be worthwhile to all those interested in middle and high school mathematics.

The talk continues a unbroken tradition going back to 1982, in which Zal has addressed the final MMC meeting in every even-numbered year. For more information and to RSVP, please access the reservation form at http://www.mmcchicago.org/reservations/form, or call 847-486-4291 and leave a voicemail.

Engineering is Elementary Proposal is Finalist in Women’s Board Competition at the University of Chicago

April 20, 2016

Congratulations to Debbie Leslie, whose proposal to the University of Chicago Women’s Board to establish an Engineering is Elementary cohort in partnership with the Woodlawn Children’s Promise Network was selected as a finalist in the proposal competition.

Engineering is Elementary is a program developed and directed by Dr. Christine Cunningham at the Boston Museum of Science. It is dedicated to supporting children and educational professionals with curricula and professional development designed to increase engineering literacy. Leslie’s work with the program is coordinated through the Early Childhood STEM Working Group at CEMSE, of which Dr. Cunningham is a member. “In forming the group, we looked for people like Christine who have made a particular contribution to the field,” says Leslie. Members of the working group from CEMSE, in addition to Leslie, include Liesje Spaepen, Gudelia Lopez, and Marty Gartzman. The Working Group is funded as part of the C-STEMEC grant, which Mike Lach oversees.

The Woodlawn Children’s Promise Community (WCPC) is a community-based organization that has set itself the goal of improving outcomes for the children of Woodlawn, a neighborhood on Chicago’s Southside. WCPC works to improve coordination between the school district, school leaders, families, and other key partners to improve education by creating a community of schools working together.

The Early Childhood STEM Working Group is a joint initiative of CEMSE at the University of Chicago and the Early Math Collaborative at the Erikson Institute. It is supported by a grant from the Chicago Community Trust. For more information please visit the CEMSE website at http://cemse.uchicago.edu.

CEMSE Staff Scheduled to Present This Month at AERA

April 5, 2016

CEMSE staff from the Outlier Research & Evaluation team are scheduled to present papers at the 2016 AERA Annual Meeting, Public Scholarship to Educate Diverse Democracies. The meeting is taking place Friday, April 8–Tuesday, April 12 in Washington, DC.

Amy Cassata and Jeanne Century
An Inductive, Mixed Method Approach to Describing “Optimal” Curriculum Implementation
April 9, 2:15–3:45 PM, Convention Center, Level Two, Exhibit Hall D

Amy Cassata and Jeanne Century
John Doe or John Dewey? The Interactive Game
April 9, 4:05–5:35 PM, Convention Center, Level Three, Ballroom C

Jeanne Century and Melanie LaForce
Identifying and Measuring STEM Schools and Programs: A Taxonomy to Bring Coherence to the Field
April 11, 4:30–6:30 PM, Convention Center, Level Two, Room 206

Melanie LaForce, Liz Noble, Heather King, Sandra Holt, and Jeanne Century
The Voice of STEM Schools: Identifying the Eight Elements of Inclusive STEM High Schools
April 11, 4:30–6:30 PM, Convention Center, Level Two, Room 206

Sarah Wille, Jeanne Century, and Miriam Pike
The Hidden Underrepresented Group: Opening the Door to Computer Science for Students with Learning Differences
April 12, 2:15–3:45 PM, Convention Center, Level Three, Ballroom C

The AERA Annual Meeting will be held April 8–12, 2016 in Washington, DC. For information and registration, visit http://www.aera.net.

UCSMP and CEMSE Authors and Staff Scheduled to Present This Month at NCSM/NCTM

April 5, 2016

UCSMP and CEMSE authors and CEMSE staff will present papers at the 2016 NCSM Annual Conference, Building Bridges between Leadership and Learning Mathematics: Leveraging Education Innovation and Research to Inspire and Engage, and the 2016 NCTM Annual Meeting & Exposition, Building a Bridge to Student Success. The meetings are taking place Monday, April 11–Saturday, April 16 the Oakland–San Francisco Bay Area, CA.

Zalman Usiskin
NCSM
A Curriculum Developer Looks at the Common Core and Its Testing
April 11, 10:30–11:30 AM, Oakland Marriott City Center, Grand Ballroom ABC (Session 1102)

Allison Whittington, Angela Schieffer, and Debbie Leslie
NCSM
Documenting and Disseminating Effective Teacher Leadership Practices in a Digital Age
April 11, 12:15–1:15 PM, OCC 207 (Session 461)

Amanda Zimolzak, Denise Porter, Sara Buethe, and Jenna Ryan
NCSM
Using Technology in Powerful Ways: Effective Technology Integration to Promote Student Growth
April 13, 8:45–9:45 AM, OCC 207 (Session 390)

Carla Strickland, Katie Rich, and Catherine A. Donaldson
NCTM
Touching Screens or Touching Objects: Which Is Better and When?
April 14, 8:00–9:15 AM, 3006 Moscone West (Session 53)

Zalman Usiskin
NCTM
A Not-So-Average Talk About Averages
April 14, 11:00–12:00, 3009 Moscone Center (Session 109)

Jeanne Di Domenico, Liz Lehman, and Debbie Leslie
NCTM
Mathematical Thinking across the Curriculum
April 14, 1:00–2:15 PM, Marriott, Yerba Buena 14/15 (Session 182)

John A. Benson
NCTM
An Exciting, Effective, Enjoyable, Efficient, and Engaging Way to Educate
April 15, 8:00–9:00 AM, 2007 Moscone West (Session 269)

Andy Isaacs and Rebecca Maxcy
NCTM
Building a Classroom Culture around the Mathematical Practices
April 15, 3:30–4:30 PM, Marriott, Golden Gate C3 (Session 487)

The NCSM and NCTM annual conferences (NCSM: April 11–13; NCTM: April 13–16) will be held in the Oakland–San Francisco Bay Area, CA. For information and registration, visit http://www.mathedleadership.org and http://www.nctm.org.

THE SESAME PROGRAM for State of Illinois Endorsements in Middle Grade Mathematics and Middle Grade Science

March 17, 2016

Spring Quarter begins March 30! Register soon! Only $500 per course.

Website: http://www.math.uchicago.edu/sesame

Spring Brochure: http://math.uchicago.edu/sesame/packet.pdf

The Seminars for Endorsement of Science and Mathematics Educators (SESAME) Program in the Department of Mathematics at the University of Chicago offers a full range of courses leading to Illinois State Endorsement for the teaching of mathematics and science in the middle grades. All SESAME courses place a strong emphasis on content and the conceptual foundations of the subject along with strategies and pedagogical techniques for bringing this content to the classroom. Teachers work together in small groups to provide appropriate interactions with their peers. The program emphasizes, to a great extent, inquiry-based learning and the discovery methods so that the teachers learn how best to employ this technique in their classrooms.

Our goal is to provide knowledgeable teachers who can deliver the subject matter to students in a highly effective way. We are in the process of recruiting teachers for our 2016 Spring courses and we hope that you, or your colleagues, are interested in participating in this program.

The first day of the quarter begins Wednesday, March 30. Every class meets on ten Wednesdays from 5:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m at the Hyde Park campus. Visit our website for more information regarding our program, course descriptions and schedules, and registering.

Each of our graduate level courses counts as 3.33 semester hours. Teachers are given letter-grades upon completion of a course. These grades will appear on an official University of Chicago transcript. Transcripts can be ordered through the Registrar’s Office and then submitted to the Illinois State Board of Education for credit towards a State of Illinois Middle Grade Mathematics or Science Endorsement. In addition, SESAME credit can be used for Chicago Public Schools Professional Development Hours and License Renewals.

Please feel free to forward this information to your colleagues. Anyone is welcome to join the program, even if he or she does not have an active teaching position.

For additional information, you can visit our website. You may also contact us at sesame@math.uchicago.edu or 773-702-7389.

SPRING 2016 COURSES, DATES, AND TIMES

March 30, April 6, 27, May 4, 11, 18, 25, June 1, 8, 15 ~ Wednesdays

ALL CLASSES WILL MEET ON THE DATES LISTED ABOVE FROM 5:00 P.M. TO 8:00 P.M.

  • MATH 51200: MIDDLE GRADE CURRICULUM, PHILOSOPHY, AND INSTRUCTIONAL METHODS
    Dates: 03/30, 04/06, 04/27, 5/4, 5/11, 5/18, 5/25, 6/1, 6/8, 6/15
    Time: 5:00 p.m. - 8:00 p.m.
    Instructor: Linda Hunt
    Location: Ryerson Hall, Room 358, University of Chicago, 1100 E 58th Street
    ISBE Middle Grade Requirement Area: Required for a Middle Grade Endorsement
    Credit hours: 3.33 Semester Hours
    Cost: $ 500
    Description: Required for any Illinois Endorsement in the Middle Grades, this course will provide practicing teachers with further knowledge and understanding of the unique intellectual, social, emotional, physical, and developmental characteristics and needs of the young adolescent. Teachers will develop middle school lessons to be shared with their peers in this course and used with their middle school students in the future.
  • MATH 51300: EARLY ADOLESCENT PSYCHOLOGY
    Dates: 03/30, 04/06, 04/27, 5/4, 5/11, 5/18, 5/25, 6/1, 6/8, 6/15
    Time: 5:00 p.m. - 8:00 p.m.
    Instructor: To be announced
    Location: Eckhart Hall, Room 207, University of Chicago, 5734 S. University Ave
    ISBE Middle Grade Requirement Area: Required for a Middle Grade Endorsement
    Credit hours: 3.33 Semester Hours
    Cost: $ 500
    Description: This class is required for any Illinois Endorsement in the Middle Grades. This course explores adolescent development through several lenses, including biological, cognitive, social, moral, and identity development. Adolescent risk-taking, self-concept, and self-esteem are reviewed. Historical and cross-cultural contexts will also be examined. Through open discussion, we'll also explore issues related to working with students who may have special needs or circumstances.
  • MATH 50500: GEOMETRY
    Dates: 03/30, 04/06, 04/27, 5/4, 5/11, 5/18, 5/25, 6/1, 6/8, 6/15
    Time: 5:00 p.m. - 8:00 p.m.
    Instructor: Henry Chan
    Location: Eckhart Hall, Room 203, University of Chicago, 5734 S. University Ave
    ISBE Middle Grade Requirement Area: Geometry
    Credit hours: 3.33 Semester Hours
    Cost: $ 500
    Description: Topics include recognizing and composing shapes, learning more about polygons and their properties, measuring angles, and learning the angle theorem. This course also addresses coordinate geometry, volume and surface areas of 3D figures, transformation and symmetry, and much more.
  • MATH 52200: ALGEBRA II
    Dates: 03/30, 04/06, 04/27, 5/4, 5/11, 5/18, 5/25, 6/1, 6/8, 6/15
    Time: 5:00 p.m. - 8:00 p.m.
    Instructor: John Boller
    Location: Eckhart Hall, Room 206, University of Chicago, 5734 S. University Ave
    Credit hours: 3.33 Semester Hours
    Cost: $ 500
    Description: This is the second of three courses in the Algebra Initiative series. Some of the material covered will be linear functions, systems of linear equations, functions and their rate of growth, quadratic polynomials and the Quadratic Equation, graphing, inequalities, and word problems.
  • PHSC 50200 : CHEMISTRY FOR ELEMENTARY TEACHERS
    Dates: 03/30, 04/06, 04/27, 5/4, 5/11, 5/18, 5/25, 6/1, 6/8, 6/15
    Time: 5:00 p.m. - 8:00 p.m.
    Instructor: Meishan Zhao
    Location: Ryerson Hall, Room 352, University of Chicago, 5734 S. University Ave
    Prerequisite: Physical Science
    Credit hours: 3.33 Semester Hours
    Cost: $ 500
    Description: Take this course to get a science endorsement while learning about chemical reactions and why they happen. What is the chemical reaction that occurs when you mix baking soda and vinegar? This course starts with states of matter, atoms, and elements, and eventually discusses acid/base, organic chemistry, and polymers.

HOW TO REGISTER:

Download the Registration...click here

Email, Mail or fax your registration after completing the form:

sesame@math.uchicago.edu

SESAME Program
Department of Mathematics
5734 S. University Ave.
Chicago, IL 60637

Fax: (773) 702 9787

All classes are held at the University of Chicago Hyde Park campus http://maps.uchicago.edu/index.shtml

If you have any questions about the program, feel free to email SESAME at sesame@math.uchicago.edu or call us at (773) 702-7389.

Free Summer Math Courses for Teachers: University of Chicago Polk Bros. Mathematics Program

March 17, 2016

We welcome teachers at all grade levels.

Teachers may take any or all courses.

All courses can be applied to:

  • license renewals
  • state middle school mathematics endorsement
  • CPS professional development hours

Where: Classes located at the University of Chicago in Hide Park

Cost: Free for CPS and Chicago Charter Teachers.
$500.00 per course for all others.

Courses:

  • Methods of Teaching Middle School Mathematics
    The Open-Ended Approach to Teaching Mathematics
    Dr. Jerry Becker
    (6 2/3 graduate semester)
    June 27 – July 28, 2016, M-Th, 9:00a.m.-12:00 noon
  • Pre-Calculus and Calculus for CPS Teachers
    Dr. Robert Fefferman
    (5 graduate semester hours)
    June 27 – July 21, 2016, M-Th, 1:30-4:30 p.m.
  • Introduction to Geometry for CPS Teachers
    Dr. Robert Fefferman
    (3 1/3 semester hours)
    July 25 – July 28, 2016, M-Th, 1:30-4:30 p.m. and ten times during the school year, to be announced

To obtain a registration form, please contact Marie Schilling:
mschilling17@earthlink.net (preferred method)
773-955-4949

Downloadable Documents:
Brochure & Application Form

Highlights from CEMSE Staff Conference Presentations

May 1, 2015

Already in 2015, CEMSE staff have presented and shared their work at a number of distinguished conferences. Here are some highlights from a handful of those presentations:

National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) Annual Conference, 2015


Title: Replacing Confusions with Coherence in Teaching Geometric Transformations
Presenter(s): Zalman Usiskin
Description: Of all the high school Common Core standards, the 10 relating to geometric transformations represent content very unfamiliar to many mathematics teachers and writers of instructional materials. As a result, confusions are common. This talk discusses some of these confusions and provides suggestions as to how to overcome them.

Title: Research on the Digital Revolution in Mathematics Curriculum, Teaching, and Learning
Presenter(s): Meg Bates and Zalman Usiskin
Description: OThis 75-minute discussion session began with a summary of the papers presented at the 3rd International Conference on Mathematics Curriculum of the Center for the Study of Mathematics Curriculum held at the University of Chicago in November 2014. Five themes were identified: new technologies; creating digital curriculum; broad looks at the landscape; implementation of digital curricula; and assessment. Then the attendees were asked to think about studies they might undertake if they had various amounts of funding. A lively discussion ensued about the opportunities and challenges that digital curricula present.

Title: Developing and Assessing Addition Fact Fluency
Presenter(s): Gina Kling and Jennifer Bay Williams
Description: What does it really mean to be fluent with addition facts, and how is this idea reflected in CCSSM? Come explore how we can use strategies, games, and activities in meaningful ways to develop a trajectory for helping all students become fluent with addition facts, and consider ways to authentically assess fact fluency.
Downloadable Materials:
Handout
Presentation

Title: Meaningful Learning and Practice: Multiplication Fact Strategies That Build Fluency
Presenter(s): Amanda Ruch and Gina Kling
Description: What does it mean for students to be fluent with multiplication facts? How can we help them meet the facts goals of CCSSM? Through analysis of student work and video of classroom teaching, participants will explore and discuss effective multiplication fact strategies and meaningful practice opportunities that help children work towards mastery.
Downloadable Materials:
Handout

National Council of Supervisors of Mathematics (NCSM) Annual Conference, 2015


Title: Supporting Reflective Teaching and Meaningful Collaboration through Various Collaborative Coaching Structures
Presenter(s): Alison Whittington and Amanda Zimolzak
Description: Collaborative coaching is a protocol that combines collaborative planning, teaching, observing and debriefing with a focus on collecting and analyzing evidence of student learning. We will share this flexible model for supporting teachers in facilitated conversations about student learning in different contexts both within and across schools.

Title: Shared Vision, Leadership, Collaboration: Building the Capacity of School Leadership Teams to Effect Meaningful Change
Presenter(s): Alison Whittington and Debbie Leslie
Description: How do schools develop the capacity to support and sustain high-quality mathematics instruction as called for in the CCSS? Participants will learn how our Principal and Teacher Leadership Institute has helped school-based mathematics leadership teams roll out and support the CCSS-M to promote a shared vision for high-quality mathematics instruction.

Title: Building Language Capacity for Access and Higher Levels of Communication in Mathematics
Presenter(s): Ava Belisle-Chatterjee, Alison Whittington, and Barbara Molina
Description: The CCSS have rigorous demands for the use of language for abstract reasoning. With an emphasis on all students, this session will address ways to build academic language, with examples of language development activities that build on and go beyond vocabulary development. We will also address ways to build the language capacity of ELLs.

Title: Everyday Mathematics Virtual Learning Community
Presenter(s): Cheryl Moran
Description: This presentation will provide an introduction to the Everyday Mathematics Virtual Learning Community (VLC). Participants will learn how to join the VLC and will receive a guided tour through the site.

Title: Supporting Effective Technology Usage and Integration to Enhance Engagement and Growth in Mathematics Learning
Presenter(s): Eliza Bryant, Sara Burnworth, Denise Porter and Amanda Zimolzak
Description: While teachers leap at the opportunity to bring technology into their classrooms, many struggle to integrate technology in ways that positively impact student growth. Participants learned about coaching tools and strategies to support effective technology integration to both increase student engagement, as well as enhance student learning.

Title: Building Language Capacity for Access and HigherLevels of Communication in Mathematics
Presenter(s): Ava Belisle-Chatterjee, Barbara Molina, Alison Whittington
Description: The Common Core State Standards for Mathematics (CCSSM) have rigorous demands for the use of language for abstract reasoning, including actions such as explaining, justifying, conjecturing, hypothesizing, evaluating, and critiquing. Students are expected to "construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others," as noted in one of the CCSSM Standards for Mathematical Practice. With an emphasis on "all students," the content of this session will address ways to build academic language, with examples of explicit and meaningful language development activities that build on and go beyond vocabulary development. Such demands for higher levels of communication are significant for all students, but particularly so for English Language Learners. With that in mind, the session content will also address ways to build the language capacity of ELLs of different English language proficiency levels so that they will not only have increased access to rigorous math content but also be able to effectively communicate their reasoning.
Downloadable Materials:
Best Practices to Support ELLs
ELP Levels
Proficiency Level Descriptors
Presentation

46th ACM Technical Symposium on Computer Science Education, 2015


Title: Factors Affecting high School Student Engagement in Introductory Computer Science Classes
Presenter(s): Sarah Wille and Dae Kim
Description: Little research exists on factors that affect high school computer science student engagement. The BASICS Study (Barriers and Supports to Implementing Computer Science) brings rigor to this issue by building on instruments developed to measure implementation and factors affecting implementation of math and science programs, and customizing them for use with the computer science curriculum, Exploring Computer Science (ECS). A poster presented at the ACM Technical Symposium on CS education aimed to: 1) report on BASICS year 1 student questionnaire findings about factors related to student engagement in ECS classes in two school districts, and in doing so 2) generate discussion about the importance of use of consistent measures in CS education research.
Downloadable Materials:
Poster

National Science Teachers Association (NSTA) Annual Conference, 2015


Title: The NGSS Collaborative
Presenter(s): Wendy Jackson (DePaul University: Chicago, IL), Liz Lehman (The University of Chicago: Chicago, IL), Rachel Shefner (Loyola University Chicago: Chicago, IL), Stacy Wenzel (Loyola University Chicago: Chicago, IL), Chandra James (Chicago Public Schools: Chicago, IL)
Description: Composed of six institutions in Chicago, the NGSS Collaborative presented its goals; strategies for helping teachers, schools, and districts transition to the NGSS; and plans for sustainability. Discussion focused on the three levels of support provided to teachers and their impacts. Teachers who are receiving coaching shared their perspectives on how participation has changed their teaching practice.
Downloadable Materials:
Handout
Presentation

Two Exciting New Projects from the Digital Curriculum Group

April 8, 2015

The Digital Curriculum Group (DCG) at CEMSE is pleased to announce beta versions of two major projects.

The Number Stories Project is a database of real-world questions based on real-world contexts supported by factual sources. Both contexts and questions are written for, and by, a wide variety of individual users. Users can create groups of problems based on theme, math concepts, their favorites, or any other category. The problems, written in the dynamic mathematics software, Cabri, allow the user to manipulate objects in 2- and 3-D environments and provide intelligent feedback based on user responses. To learn more about this project, please see our About page.

Number Stories is currently being field-tested in a precalculus class at UC Berkeley. The DCG expects to expand field tests this spring to interested children and adults to get feedback on the problems.

The Data Workshop Project is a web-based data exploration environment designed to help users understand basic experiment design (data definition, collection, and organization) and subsequent analysis (data representation and statistical examination). Along with entering their own raw data, users can generate data either by creating and conducting surveys in the Data Workshop Survey Room, or by designing Simulations, such as coin flips and dice tosses, with customizable setups. All generated results can then be extensively analyzed in the Data Workshop Workbench. Both raw data and survey results can be shared with other users. To learn more about this project, please see our About page.

Data Workshop was field-tested at the Western Michigan University in Fall 2014 by a statistics and probability class for preservice elementary school teachers. Feedback from the field tests provided a framework for the new version of Data Workshop that will be unveiled this spring. The DCG expects to field test the Data Workshop this summer and fall.

For more information on either of these projects or if you are interested in field-testing, contact Katie Rich or Nicole Carlson at numberstories@lists.uchicago.edu or dataworkshop@lists.uchicago.edu.

Free Summer Math Courses for Teachers: University of Chicago Polk Bros. Mathematics Program

April 3, 2015

Courses:

  • Methods of Teaching Middle School Mathematics
    Dr. Jerry Becker
    (6 2/3 semester hours)
    June 29 – July 30, 2015, M-Th, 9:00-12:00
  • Math Content for Elementary and Middle School Teachers: Algebra
    Dr. Robert Fefferman
    (5 semester hours)
    June 29 – July 23, 2015, M-Th, 1:30-4:30
  • Number Theory for Middle School Teachers
    Dr. Robert Fefferman
    (3 1/3 semester hours)
    July 27 – July 30, 2015, M-Th, 1:30-4:30 and ten times during the school year, to be announced

All courses can be applied to

  • state recertification
  • state middle school math endorsement
  • CPS lane credit

Where: The University of Chicago, Hyde Park Campus, room to be announced
Teachers may take any or all courses. We welcome teachers at all grade levels.

Cost: Free for CPS teachers (You may have to purchase some materials.)
$500.00 per course for non-CPS teachers

To obtain a registration form, please use the downloadable form below or contact Marie Schilling:
mschilling17@earthlink.net (the preferred method of contact)
773-955-4949

Downloadable Documents:
Application Form
Course Announcement
Course Descriptions

Early Childhood STEM Working Group Convenes on March 12-13, 2015

April 3, 2015

CEMSE and the Early Math Collaborative at the Erikson Institute are organizing an Early Childhood STEM Working Group, an initiative supported by the Searle Funds at the Chicago Community Trust. The goal of the working group is to pool knowledge about the development of STEM concepts and skills during the early years, discuss ways to support early STEM education, and produce usable summaries and recommendations for the field.

The group had its first meeting on March 12-13, 2015, and will meet again on June 17-18, 2015. The Working Group’s guiding questions for this year are: What are the critical STEM concepts and skills for young children to acquire? What do we know about young children’s development in STEM disciplines? What further research is needed to advance our understanding of young children’s STEM learning?

Next year, the group will convene for two more sessions to focus on the following questions: What does, or should, “STEM education” mean for young children? What is needed to help educators achieve this vision? What research and/or policy initiatives should be prioritized to improve classroom practice and outcomes for children?

The Working Group Organizing Committee includes CEMSE members Martin Gartzman, Debbie Leslie, and Liesje Spaepen, as well as Jie-Qi Chen, Jennifer McCray, and Lauren Solarski from the Erikson Institute.

The Early Childhood STEM Working Group also includes top scholars and educators from around the country:

  • Carol Brunson Day, NAEYC
  • Christine Cunningham, Boston Museum of Science
  • Chip Donohue, Erikson Institute
  • Linda Espinosa, University of Missouri at Columbia
  • Daryl Greenfield, University of Miami
  • Susan Levine, University of Chicago
  • Leona Schauble, Vanderbilt University
  • Karen Worth, Wheelock College

For more information, contact Debbie Leslie, daleslie@uchicago.edu

“From the Classroom to the Lab and Back”: An Early Childhood Math Research Study

April 3, 2015

The CEMSE Early Childhood Research Team recently completed data collection for a study investigating the strategies and methods preschool teachers use to teach math to young children. The study, funded by the McCormick Foundation, is designed to understand whether and how research-based “exemplar” lessons can play a role in helping teachers learn and incorporate new research findings on children’s learning of math concepts into their instructional practice.

Recent research at the University of Chicago and elsewhere shows that young children are more capable of learning certain spatial concepts than previously thought, such as the meaning of "angle," or the results of rotating objects mentally. These types of skills are important building blocks for later mathematics and science achievement (e.g., Wai, Lubinski, Benbow, 2009). Other recent research, including that from UChicago’s Spatial Intelligence Learning Center, suggests there are important, generalizable instructional strategies, such as using analogies, alignment, comparison, gesture, and spatial language during instruction, that can help young children learn new mathematical concepts. The use of these instructional strategies aids students in improving their spatial reasoning, as well as other kinds of math (Richland McDonough, 2010). The current study, which is a collaboration between CEMSE researchers and curriculum developers and researchers from the Department of Psychology at the University of Chicago, investigates how lessons and curricula can support teachers’ use of these strategies, especially in under-represented areas of mathematics, such as spatial reasoning.

Recent research at the University of Chicago and elsewhere shows that young children are more capable of learning certain spatial concepts than previously thought, such as the meaning of "angle," or the results of rotating objects mentally. These types of skills are important building blocks for later mathematics and science achievement (e.g., Wai, Lubinski, Benbow, 2009). Other recent research, including that from UChicago’s Spatial Intelligence Learning Center, suggests there are important, generalizable instructional strategies, such as using analogies, alignment, comparison, gesture, and spatial language during instruction, that can help young children learn new mathematical concepts. The use of these instructional strategies aids students in improving their spatial reasoning, as well as other kinds of math (Richland McDonough, 2010). The current study, which is a collaboration between CEMSE researchers and curriculum developers and researchers from the Department of Psychology at the University of Chicago, investigates how lessons and curricula can support teachers’ use of these strategies, especially in under-represented areas of mathematics, such as spatial reasoning.

The CEMSE team also assessed student learning from these lessons. Researchers administered pre- and post-assessments to the children who participated in the lessons and to a comparison group of children who did not participate in the lessons.

Preliminary results indicate that children who participated in the set of lessons improved significantly more at post-test than children who did not, suggesting that the content of the lessons does indeed help students learn these traditionally under-taught spatial concepts. The CEMSE team is currently transcribing and coding the teachers’ and students’ speech, gesture, and analogy use in each videotaped lesson to better understand how these factors interact with the different versions of the lessons teachers were provided, as well as how children’s learning was affected by these differences.

This study, led by Debbie Leslie and Liesje Spaepen, includes researchers Katie Flores, Janet Sorkin, Lily Ye, Ryan Smethers, and Caroline Owens. The study team also includes Drs. Susan Levine and Susan Goldin-Meadow, Professors of Psychology at the University of Chicago, and Dr. Lindsey Richland, Professor in Human Development at the University of Chicago.

For more information, contact Liesje Spaepen, PhD, liesje@uchicago.edu

Outlier Research Group Updates

April 3, 2015

The Outlier Research group at CEMSE is currently working on some impressive projects, including (but not limited to):

  • finishing up a project with Chicago Public Schools. In this project they worked with the district to develop a rubric for district STEM schools and programs, as well as assessments for this rubric.
  • beginning an evaluation of the University of Chicago’s Civic Leadership Academy, a University effort to develop and support the civic infrastructure of Chicago.
  • working with the state of Utah to advise the development of Utah’s STEM Education Policy, which is rooted in Outlier’s S3 findings.

Stay tuned for more exciting news about these ventures!

The following Outlier members will also be giving presentations around the country:

  • Melanie LaForce, Liz Noble, Heather King, and Sandra Holt have 2 presentations at the NSTA STEM Forum in May in Minneapolis.
  • Melanie LaForce will be presenting at the Battelle Connect for Success conference in June in Columbus.
  • Melanie LaForce will be presenting at a Central Ohio STEM leaders’ summit in Columbus.

Upcoming MSPnet Academy Webinar Presentations

January 23, 2015

Members of the Outlier group at CEMSE will be conducting two webinars for the MSPnet Academy:

Making Sense of Measuring Implementation in Educational Research
February 25, 2015 - 2:00 PM (Eastern)
Presenters: Jeanne Century and Amy Cassata
RSVP here

The Current State of K-12 Computer Science Education in the US
March 12, 2015 - 2:00 PM (Eastern)
Presenters: Sarah Wille and Jeanne Century
RSVP here

Jeanne Century Delivering a Keynote at the Upcoming STEM-C Partnerships: Computing Education for the 21st Century PI Meeting

January 23, 2015

Jeanne Century will be delivering a keynote at the upcoming STEM-C Partnerships: Computing Education for the 21st Century (STEM-CP: CE21) PI Meeting in Baltimore on January 23rd. The name of the talk is: “More than Sustainability: Bringing Staying Power to Computer Science Education.”

UCSMP and CEMSE Authors speaking at MMC Conference

January 21, 2015

UCSMP and CEMSE authors and CEMSE staff are scheduled to present at the Metropolitan Mathematics Club of Chicago Conference of Workshops. This conference is in workshop format, by teachers for teachers, and has sessions for kindergarten through college.

UCSMP secondary authors who will be presenting include the following:

  • Sue Brown: "Periodic Functions – Just Dabble Your Toes in the Shallow End!" (Session 135).
  • Todd Edwards: "Fostering Creativity through Student Problem Posing" (Session 204).
  • Ray Klein: "CCSS, TI-NSpire Handheld, and Transformational Geometry" (Session 218).
  • Steve Viktora: “Creating Escher-Type Tessellations" (Session 225).
  • Nancy Powell: "Eating Volumes in Calculus" (Session 235).
  • Nancy Powell: "Symmetry All Around Us" (Session 310).
  • David Spangler: “Probability and the Common Core” (Session 316).
  • Steve Viktora: "Adventures with Geometric Constructions" (Session 324).
  • George Marino: "Exploring with a CAS Drawing Program on the TI-NSpire (Session 330).
  • John Benson: “My Favorite Paradoxes” (Session 332).

The following CEMSE staff members are presenters:

  • Katie Flores: “Collaborating to Implement Open Response Problems and Plan Re-engagment Discussions” (Session 101).
  • Andy Carter, Amanda Ruch, and John Benson: “Using Student Work to Reengage with Challenging Open Response Problems” (Session 201).

Also Sara Mahoney, Session 331, "Geometry Tasks that Can't Be Pigeonholed", worked for UCSMP while an undergraduate at the University of Chicago.

The conference will be held Saturday, January 24, 2015, at Adlai E. Stevenson High School in Lincolnshire, IL. For information and registration, visit www.mmcchicago.org.

An Amazing Century: Where We Have Been and Where We Are Going

June 9, 2014

Zalman Usiskin, Professor Emeritus of Education and Director of UCSMP, University of Chicago.

Presented: May 9, 2014

In honor of the 100th anniversary of the Metropolitan Mathematics Club of Chicago, at the organization's last meeting of the 2013-2014 school year, Zalman Usiskin presented a talk titled "An Amazing Century: Where We Have Been and Where We Are Going”. The Center for Elementary Mathematics and Science Education and the University of Chicago School Mathematics Project are pleased to present a video of this presentation.

Background: In the 1913-1914 school year, the Men's Mathematics Club of Chicago (MMC) was founded. In 1972 the club welcomed women members for the first time and a year later changed its name to the Metropolitan Mathematics Club of Chicago. The MMC has a significant history that includes its being instrumental in the founding of the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics. For this, the MMC has NCTM affiliate charter #1. More information about the MMC can be found at www.mmcchicago.org.

Videographer: Henrique Cirne-Lima

Location: Fountain Blue Banquet and Convention Center, Des Plaines, Illinois

Outlier Expands Its Efforts to Improve Computer Science Education

May 29, 2014

Organizations such as the National Science Foundation and the non-profit Code.org have engaged with Outlier Research Evaluation (CEMSE’s research and evaluation arm) in their efforts to improve computer science education in the United States, particularly in urban schools and for minority students under-exposed to the discipline. For more information about Outlier’s work with computer science education read “Debugging American Computer Science Education”

Polk Brothers - University of Chicago Program in Mathematics for CPS Teachers Offered for Summer 2014

April 23, 2014

These three mathematics courses are offered free of charge for Chicago Public School and Charter School teachers. The courses – Methods of Teaching Middle School Mathematics, Pre-Calculus and Calculus for Middle School Teachers, and Geometry for Middle School Teachers – provide both a modern method of mathematics education and a deepened knowledge and appreciation for mathematics. The courses are designed primarily for K-8 teachers, and are intended to assume virtually no background. They will give teachers an enjoyable experience, while allowing them to get away from the traditional math classroom that too often emphasizes memorization of formulae and rules rather than the beautiful ideas and creativity that are the hallmark of the subject. The courses are designed to give teachers who previously disliked mathematics the opportunity to own and love it and to show them a compelling way to transmit this attitude to their students. Those teachers who already have great enthusiasm for the subject will enjoy seeing some really deep new mathematics presented in a very self-contained simple way.

Course credit can be applied toward state endorsement, state recertification, and CPS lane credit. All classes will be taught at the University of Chicago H dye Park Campus. The courses a re free for CPS and Chicago Charter teachers, $500.00 per course for all others.

For announcement, course descriptions, and to download an application click here. Or for more information, please email Marie Schilling (mschilling17@earthlink.net).

UCSMP-CEMSE authors presenting at NCSM and NCTM

April 9, 2014

April 7–April 12, UCSMP authors will be presenting at the National Council of Supervisors of Mathematics (NCSM) annual conference, the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) Research Conference, and the NCTM annual conference.

At the NCTM Research Conference:

Monday, 5:45 – 6:45 PM
Session 18: Denisse Thompson (and others)
"Test Item Analysis and Modification: Implications of Teacher Perceptions”

Wednesday, 1:14 – 2:30 PM
Session 147: Denisse Thompson (and others)
"The Teacher's Role in Formative Assessment: Finland, Canada, and U.S.”

At NCSM:

Tuesday, 8:45 – 9:45 AM
Session 209: Alison Whittington, Denise Porter
“Collaborative Coaching: Working Together to Support Meaningful Teacher Collaboration and Reflective Teaching”

Tuesday, 10:00 – 11:00 AM
Session 222: Megan Schleppenbach-Bates, Cheryl Moran
“Using a Virtual Learning Community for Customized Professional Development”

Tuesday, 2:30 - 3:30 PM
Session 263: Steve Viktora
"Using 'Situations' to Improve Teachers' Mathematical Content Knowledge"

Wednesday, 8:45 – 9:45 AM
Session 307: Denise Porter, Eliza Bryant
“Differentiated Professional Development (PD): Providing High Quality Supports Through a Balanced PD Model”

At NCTM:

Thursday, 11:30 AM - 12:00 PM
Session 147: Nancy Powell
"Real Math + Students = Engagement"

Thursday, 2:00 - 3:00 PM
Session 220: Denisse Thompson
"Reasoning in the Middle Grades: It's Easier Than You Think"

Thursday, 2:00 - 3:00 PM
Session 222: Steve Viktora
"A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Formula"

Thursday 3:30 – 4:30 PM
Exhibit workshop: Denise Porter and Rebecca Maxcy
“Virtual Learning Community: Uniting Everyday Mathematics Teachers”

Friday, 8:00 – 9:15 AM
Session 318: John Benson, Andy Carter, and Amanda Ruch
"Student-Friendly Rubrics: Connecting Open-Response Tasks to Mathematical Practices"

Friday, 9:30 – 10:30 AM
Session 336: Zalman Usiskin
"What Changes Should Be Made for the Next Edition of the CCSSM"

Friday, 9:45 – 11:00 AM
Session 362: Liesje Spaepen, Katie Flores, Amanda Ruch
“Embedding Enrichment in Math Instruction for Primary Children”

Friday, 11:00 AM – 12:00 noon
Exhibition Workshop: Andy Isaacs and Rebecca Maxcy
“Seeing the Spiral: How Everyday Mathematics Aligns with CCSS”

Saturday, 9:45 – 11:00 AM
Session 617: Amanda Ruch, Gina Kling and Ellen Dairyko
“Helping Children Master Multiplication Facts in a Meaningful Way”

Outlier Research Evaluation Receives NSF Grant to Study the Barriers and Supports to Implementing Computer Science

March 24, 2014

Outlier Research Evaluation is carrying out a computer science research study intended to inform and support the computer science education community. Funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF), the two and a half year study, called “Barriers and Supports to Implementing Computer Science” (The BASICS Study), examines the status of implementation of an introductory high school computer science course, Exploring Computer Science (ECS), and the supports for and barriers to that implementation in three school districts – DC Public Schools, Chicago Public Schools and Los Angeles Unified School District. The BASICS Study goals support NSF’s CS10K effort to have 10,000 well trained computer science teachers in 10,000 schools with the intent that our research will: (1) inform computer science education leaders about the supports for and barriers to wide-scale high school computer science education implementation; (2) provide tools for measuring computer science program implementation and the supports and barriers that affect implementation, and; (3) create research-informed products that include resources and recommendations for implementing and growing computer science education.

This new research builds on Outlier’s previous NSF-funded work rigorously studying implementation of educational innovations (new practices and programs) and the factors (contexts and conditions) that affect innovation implementation and sustainability. The BASICS Study also stems from a previous computer-science–focused study, OS4CS, which established a more comprehensive understanding of our nation’s current high school computer science teaching and learning environment.

The BASICS Study employs a mixed-methods research design, collecting data through teacher and student questionnaires; interviews of ECS developers, school district personnel, school leaders, and teacher; and student focus groups. Understanding how ECS came to be implemented in a range of sites can a have great impact on the use and endurance of ECS and other introductory computer science courses today and in the future. Research will highlight the challenges to systemic efforts to increase accessibility, quality and quantity of high school introductory computer science education and offer recommendations to meet those challenges, ultimately helping the K-12 computer science community bring needed programs into schools, and support lasting, systemic change.

The BASICS Study, lead by Jeanne Century and Sarah Wille, includes researchers Courtney Heppner, Sarah Rand, Heather King and Amelia Baxter-Stoltzfus. The BASICS team is fortunate to be working with Loyola University’s Center for Science and Mathematics Education as project evaluators, as well as the following BASICS Study project advisors:

  • Jake Baskin, Program Manager/Code.org
  • Baker Franke, HS Computer Science Teacher, Dept. Chair/University of Chicago Laboratory Schools
  • Mark Guzdial, Professor/College of Computing at the Georgia Institute of Technology
  • Brook Osborne, 9–12 Program Manager/Code.org
  • Chris Stephenson, Executive Director/Computer Science Teachers Association
  • Brenda Wilkerson, IT Program Manager/Chicago Public Schools

For more information, contact Sarah Wille, PhD – Co-Principal Investigator, swille@uchicago.edu

Paul Sally, first director of UCSMP, dies at age 80

January 13, 2014

Paul Sally, Jr., professor and Director of Undergraduate Studies in the University of Chicago Mathematics Department and a legend as a teacher, died unexpectedly on December 30, 2013.

Paul majored in mathematics at Boston College and began his career as a high school mathematics teacher at the Boston College High School. In 1965, he received his PhD from Brandeis and came to the University of Chicago. Within two years he received a Quantrell award for distinguished undergraduate teaching. He continued to be known for his teaching throughout his career at Chicago.

Paul’s mathematical research was in the area of harmonic analysis but to those of us in mathematics education he was known for his substantial work with teachers and students. From 1983-87, he was the overall director of UCSMP. During that time, he co-directed (with Sheila Sconiers) the UCSMP program to train specialist mathematics teachers in grades 4–6. This program involved a dozen school districts across the nation interested in having their elementary school students taught mathematics by teachers whose main job was to teach mathematics. This program was innovative for its time and would still be considered innovative today.

In 1988, influenced by a program Arnold Ross had begun at Ohio State University, Paul began the Young Scholars Program (YSP), a summer program for students in grades 7–12 from the Chicago area who are particularly interested in mathematics.

Throughout his career, Paul had a particular interest in the mathematics education of inner city youth. In 1992, Paul initiated his Seminars for Elementary Specialists and Mathematics Educators (SESAME) program for Chicago area teachers to earn a middle grades mathematics endorsement. In 2005, he began work with the Chicago Public Schools (CPS), University of Illinois - Chicago, and DePaul University to create a program that enables CPS 8th grade teachers to take courses at any one of these institutions to become certified to teach algebra in CPS elementary schools. These initiatives have helped thousands of CPS students take algebra in 8th grade who in previous years would never would have had the opportunity and strengthened the mathematics education of many thousands of others.

Paul was diagnosed with diabetes as a teenager and lost sight in one eye in 1975. In his later years, he lost both legs and almost all the sight in his other eye, but he never stopped teaching. He would dictate the mathematics to be written on a board for his classes and an assistant would write it.

In March 2012, Paul received the Illinois Council of Teachers of Mathematics Distinguished Life Achievement in Mathematics Award. This award is given to an Illinois mathematics educator who has retired or is near retirement. Paul received the award even though he had made it clear that he would never retire. And so it came to be. At the time of his death, he was planning the classes that would begin the next week.

See more at: http://news.uchicago.edu/article/2014/01/02/paul-j-sally-jr-influential-mathematician-and-educator-1933-2013?utm_source=newsmodule#sthash.n6vWuMYr.dpuf and at http://www.math.uchicago.edu/.

CEMSE and UEI Release Major Study About K-12 Computer Science Education

October 30, 2013

The University of Chicago Center for Elementary Mathematics and Science Education (CEMSE) and the Urban Education Institute (UEI) have released the results of an 18-month study Building An Operating System For Computer Science Education (OS4CS). On September 25, 2013, authors presented their findings in a special webinar (which can be viewed here). This project is the first of its kind in the United States to examine the current high school computer science (CS) teaching population, the support they have, and contexts in which they teach.

The OS4CS report is organized into six components and delivered online with data visualizations, video clips and audio clips from interviews. The first of the components, the PD Landscape Study, focuses on describing where and when professional development for high school teachers has happened, what that professional development entails, and who is participating in it. The second, the Teacher Capacity Study, complements the PD Landscape Study by describing a large sample of high school CS teachers—who they are, where they are, how they teach, and the conditions that affect their teaching. A third component of the project, CS in Schools, enhances understanding of the first two by providing in-depth descriptions of CS education in schools using the voices of high school CS teachers and their administrators.

The other two components of the project—Stories from the Field and the PD Design Studio, focused on providing stakeholders who wish to grow computer science education locally with concrete examples and action steps for doing so. Stories from the Field offers four examples of how advocates for CS education have made progress in their communities. The Design Studio was a face-to-face workshop conducted with PD providers to examine the findings from the Landscape Study and use them to improve existing PD offerings for CS teachers. The final project component, Five Challenges and Call to Action, provides a summary of the themes the researchers observed across the other components as well as recommendations for next steps.

CEMSE and UEI completed this work funded by Google under the direction of the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) in partnership with the National Science Foundation (NSF), Google, the Computer Science Teachers Association (CSTA), Microsoft, and the National Center for Women and Information Technology (NCWIT).

Research and Evaluation Group Conducts Evaluation of TECH CORPS

October 11, 2013

CEMSE Lead Researcher Melanie LaForce and Associate Project Director Courtney Heppner will be conducting a 1-year evaluation of TECH CORPS. This national non-profit organization is dedicated to improving K−12 education at the grassroots level by helping educators effectively use technology in their schools. The evaluation of TECH CORPS will focus on the status of implementation for two of their programs: Techie Club and Techie Camp. The evaluation will examine the TECH CORPS mission and strategies as a whole, as well as examine specific and unique strategies and experiences between Clubs and Camps. The evaluation will collect both qualitative and quantitative data through surveys, interviews and focus groups to both understand the impact of the program on students perceived knowledge and skills as well as understand student attitudes, self-efficacy and career aspirations pertaining to computer science and engineering.

October 24th Dinner Symposium for Illinois School Leaders

October 24, 2013

On Thursday, October 24, the Chicago STEM Education Consortium (C-STEMEC) is joining the Illinois Science Teachers Association (ISTA) in hosting a special free Dinner Symposium for school and district administrators, policy leaders, and education reformers about STEM education. The event will feature engaging sessions on implementing the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics, the new Next Generation Science Standards, and ways to organize schools and districts to best take advantage of state and national resources designed to support these initiatives. As a C-STEMEC partner, CEMSE encourages all interested parties to attend this event.

Registration is open to all school and district leaders in Illinois, and symposium attendees will receive access to the ISTA’s IL Science Education Conference (ISEC) exhibit hall. Register Now: https://stemforiladmins.eventbrite.com

Purple Asparagus Evaluation Featured on Jamie Oliver's Blog

August 9, 2013

Jamie Oliver's Food Revolution blog recently featured Purple Asparagus and CEMSE's evaluation of their Delicious Nutritious Adventures Program. Read the blog post.

CEMSE's Research and Evaluation Team Featured in the American Evaluation Association Blog

July 10, 2013

The American Evaluation Association blog recently featured Sarah Rand and her work with the Research and Evaluation team and CEMSE's web development team for their innovative online reporting. To see these blog posts visit http://aea365.org/blog/?p=9441 and http://aea365.org/blog/?p=9302.

Hanna Davis’s Data Visualization

May 16, 2013

Hannah Davis, a master’s degree student at New York University’s ITP (Interactive Telecommunications Program) has been working with the CEMSE Research and Evaluation Team on developing data visualizations for the research project: The Ohio STEM Learning Network (OSLN): A Study of Factors Affecting Implementation, Spread and Sustainability. Recently, one of Hanna’s visualizations, created with Sarah Hallacher, was published in the Washington Post. The info graphic displays emotions evoked by presidential candidates over the last 30 years. See How Did the Candidates Make You Feel?

University of Chicago Program in Mathematics for CPS Teachers: June 2013–June 2014

April 8, 2013

Supported by Funding from the Polk Brothers Foundation, the University of Chicago is offering a collection of three mathematics courses for teachers that provide both a modern method of mathematics education and a deepened knowledge and appreciation for mathematics. The courses are designed primarily for K–8 teachers and are intended to assume virtually no mathematical background. They will give teachers an enjoyable experience, while allowing them to get away from the traditional math classroom that too often emphasizes memorization of formulae and rules rather than the beautiful ideas and creativity that are the hallmark of the subject. We want to give teachers who previously disliked mathematics the opportunity to own and love it, and to show them a compelling way to transmit this attitude to their students. Those teachers who already have great enthusiasm for the subject will enjoy seeing some really deep new mathematics presented in a very self-contained simple way.

Teachers may take one, two or all three courses. The following three courses are offered:

Math 53011: Methods of Teaching Middle School Mathematics - the Open-Ended Approach to Teaching Mathematics.

This class provides teachers with an effective, modern method of mathematics education, known as the open-ended approach. This method works by introducing a series of problems that seem extremely elementary, but that model central mathematical themes. Open-ended problems are designed to have a number of different methods of solution. Students are asked to solve the problems in as many different ways as they can. This method is very attractive to students because it gets them into a creative, energetic mode of attacking the mathematics, rather than memorizing mechanical formulae and procedures. Students are surprised to see their friends come up with completely different (but equally valid) ways of solving the problems. Experience has shown that teachers and students alike greatly enjoy this process. This approach can be used in any mathematics class, K–12.

Math 53014: Math Content for Elementary and Middle School Teachers: Algebra.

The goal of this class is to help teachers deepen their understanding of the mathematical ideas underlying the mathematics curriculum in elementary and middle grades. We are particularly concerned with continuity from arithmetic to algebra and the interdependence between the two areas in mathematics. We will explore the ways in which algebraic arguments and theorems depend on basic ideas in arithmetic and the ways, in turn, in which arithmetic is dependent on algebraic ideas. For example, we will use basic assumptions in arithmetic to give algebraic proofs of important theorems, such as The Fundamental Theorem of Arithmetic. (Note that while this course can be applied toward a State of Illinois middle grades mathematics endorsement, it does not apply to the Chicago Public Schools Algebra Initiative credential.)

Math 53016: Number Theory for Middle School Teachers.

This course will begin during the fifth week of the program. Although it will continue some of the themes from the Algebra course, people who have not taken the Algebra course will also be comfortable with the material. We will continue working with prime numbers and will use modular number systems to explore some basic ideas in arithmetic and algebra.


The Methods class will be taught by Professor Jerry Becker, Coordinator of Mathematics Education in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction at Southern Illinois University Carbondale. The other two classes will be taught by Professor Robert Fefferman, Dean of the University of Chicago Physical Sciences Division.

Course credit can be applied towards state endorsement, state recertification, and CPS lane credit. All of the classes will be held at the University of Chicago Hyde Park Campus; the building and room to be announced. All of the courses are free for Chicago Public School teachers, including Chicago charter school teachers; for all others there is a charge of $500.00 per course.

To Register

Complete The University of Chicago – Polk Brothers Registration Form (use either the MS Word document or the pdf version).

Email the 1-page form to Marie Schilling: mschilling17@earthlink.net or send it to the address at the bottom of the form.

Enhancements for the Virtual Learning Community

April 3, 2013

If you’ve visited the Everyday Mathematics Virtual Learning Community (VLC) lately, you might have noticed a few changes. The VLC, open to registered users at http://vlc.uchicago.edu, recently surpassed 11,000 members and now has over 400 lesson videos and other resources for Everyday Mathematics educators. And the VLC team at CEMSE is busy making more enhancements for 2013.

The VLC is a National Science Foundation-funded website for Everyday Mathematics teachers to share resources and collaborate around issues of instructional practice. Work on the site began in July 2010, as the VLC team recruited teachers to provide lesson videos and ideas for the VLC, prepared various instructional and professional development tools for display, and designed the site’s interface and social networking features.

The site was opened to educators in June 2011 with little advertising. “The response has been really positive,” according to Meg Bates, VLC principal investigator. “When we first posted the site, we got a lot of correspondence from people in the field telling us that this is a really good resource, which fills a need.” The VLC membership has swelled largely based on strong word-of-mouth among teachers and instructional leaders. As the site has grown, so have the various resources and opportunities available. The VLC now offers:

  • Over 100 lesson video clips, mostly from first- and fourth-grade classrooms, with video from other grades to come soon.
  • Over 300 other resources, ranging from assessment booklets to new game record sheets and vocabulary cards.
  • Classroom tours from real Everyday Mathematics teachers, showcasing common issues like how to manage classroom materials, how to keep assessment records, and how to hold special events like game days.
  • A searchable archive of frequently-asked questions about Everyday Mathematics, culled from the questions and answers of practicing teachers posted on a longstanding Everyday Mathematics listserv.
  • Dozens of special interest groups on various hot topics, such as teaching in multi-grade classrooms, working with gifted learners, and implementing the Common Core State Standards with the curriculum.

As the site expands, more and more of the VLC’s growth can be credited not to the VLC team, but to VLC users. The site includes a button for users to share resources, and many educators have taken advantage of this feature. All resources shared by VLC users are marked with an icon, so that teachers can easily find new materials submitted by other educators.

What’s next for the VLC? The VLC team is working on building the potential of the site as a professional development tool for teachers and instructional leaders all over the country. Recent additions to the site have included tools for helping Professional Learning Communities use the resources on the site to study various topics and conduct guided inquiry into student work.

The video club is one of the live professional-development models the VLC team is testing. Cheryl Moran, the lead VLC team member and one of the Everyday Mathematics authors, facilitates a video club of five or six teachers from one site. “The focus is student learning,” explains Moran. “We watch the video and discuss what the children are learning. I might ask, ‘What did you notice?’ or ‘What is your evidence?’ We are looking for evidence of learning, not just conjecture.” According to Moran, this seems to be an effective way to get the teachers more engaged. The team plans to make this a regular part of the site. This would go along with increased social functions, where members might be able to friend one another or offer suggested material.

Moran adds that they plan to group together video clips that will serve as learning packages about selected subjects. These would be more loosely structured than the formal professional development sessions that are offered by CEMSE School Support Services.

The VLC team is always open to suggestions about the site. If you have ideas, please email VLC principal investigator Meg Bates at megbates@uchicago.edu. And if you haven’t visited the VLC in a while, we urge you to return.

Sarah Rand to Participate in Healthy School Seminar

March 21, 2013

On Thursday, March 21st, beginning at 8:00 am, Anne Gillespie, principal of the Academy for Global Citizenship (AGC) will host a seminar to share the school’s innovative strategies for fostering a culture of health. Principal Gillespie will be joined by Krish Mohip, the Principal of Walsh ElementarySchool in Pilsen, and Sarah Rand, the Associate Project Director at the University of Chicago’s Center for Elementary Mathematics and Science Education (CEMSE).

The seminar will address the importance of Wellness education and provide practical strategies, resources and best practices for integrating wellness into the school environment and curriculum to support the development lifelong habits.

The seminar will be held at the school, 4647 W. 47th St. Chicago, IL 60632. For more information, visit the AGC website.

Students’ Food Choices Evaluated With iPad App

March 12, 2013

The Good Food Festival and Conference blog has highlighted the work of CEMSE staff members, Sarah Rand and Amy Cassata, in their evaluation of Purple Asparagus’ Delicious Nutritious Adventures program. Melissa Graham, Executive Director of Purple Asparagus, explains that to obtain funding to expand their program they need statistical evidence of what they see every day, “that our program teaches kids that healthy and tasty are not mutually exclusive when it comes to good food.” Do achieve this, CEMSE has partnered with Region Apps, LLC , and Purple Asparagus to develop a student survey iPad app as part of a program evaluation of Purple Asparagus’ Delicious Nutritious Adventures program. “We really wanted to create a technology tool for this project that would be engaging for students and help facilitate our process of data collection,” says Sarah Rand. Children in participating classrooms will take the survey before and after participating in a series of monthly Purple Asparagus lessons. The program evaluation, conducted by CEMSE, is taking place in ten CPS first grade classrooms over the 2012-2013 school year. To read the whole post go to the Good Food Festival and Conference website. In addition, Sarah Rand will present on the Better Nutrition in Schools panel at the Good Food Festival in Chicago.

Lach and Gartzman Participate in Webinar on Supporting High Quality Mathematics Instruction

February 28, 2013

Michael Lach, Director of STEM Policy and Strategic Initiatives at the University of Chicago Urban Education Institute, and Martin Gartzman, Executive Director of CEMSE, participated in a webinar on February 22 that examined two related initiatives: the Cook County Mathematics Initiative (CCMI) and the Silicon Valley Mathematics Initiative (SVMI). CCMI, now in its third year, involves 32 high-needs school districts in suburban Cook County, IL. It was formed in partnership with a state-funded regional office of education that is typical of similar agencies in most states. SVMI was established in 1996 and involves over 35 school districts in California.

CCMI and SVMI are comprehensive initiatives aimed at improving the teaching and learning of mathematics in participating districts and schools. The two initiatives share common elements but have many unique features and organizational structures. The webinar will explore factors that have led to the successful development of regional and district mathematics leadership capacity and teacher leadership that, in turn, support high quality mathematics instruction and assessment. Examining CCMI and SVMI will highlight how small districts can collaborate to find joint solutions to instructional improvement in mathematics as they transition to implementation of programs aligned with the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics.

The webinar was hosted by the Math and Science Partnership Network (MSPnet), an electronic learning community for the Math and Science Partnership Program. A major research and development effort funded by the National Science Foundation, the MSP program responds to concerns over the performance of the nation's children in mathematics and science. Institutions of higher education partner with K-12 districts and others to effect improvement in K-12 mathematics and science education.

The webinar moderator was Kimberly Descoteaux; other presenters included Mary Jo Tavormina, Project Director for West Cook Mathematics Initiative and South Cook Mathematics Initiative, Gudelia Lopez, Senior Program Officer in Education at The Chicago Community Trust, David Foster, Executive Director of the Silicon Valley Mathematics Initiative, and Sendhil Revuluri, Senior Curriculum Developer at the University of Illinois Chicago.

Sarah Rand to be on Panel at the Good Food Festival

February 19, 2013

CEMSE research and evaluation associate Sarah Rand will participate in the Good Food Festival on March 15, 2013, at the UIC Forum. Rand will present information about CEMSE’s Purple Asparagus evaluation project as part of the Better Nutrition in Schools panel. Other panelists include Annie Lionberger (Manager of Health and Wellness Promotion at Chicago Public Schools), Kymm Mutch of School Food FOCUS (invited) and Melissa Graham (founder and director of Purple Asparagus). The panel will be moderated by Rosa Ramirez from the Healthy Schools Campaign.

To learn more about the Purple Asparagus evaluation project, visit our Research and Evaluation page. To learn more about this event and for tickets visit the Good Food Festival and Conference web site.

CEMSE to Create Skynet Junior Scholars Web Portal

February 15, 2013

CEMSE staff are designing a web portal for the Skynet Junior Scholars program. Funded by a $1.6 million grant from the National Science Foundation, the program will engage approximately 1,400 middle school students in exploring the universe with research-grade robotic telescopes. University of Chicago Physics Professor Richard Kron is leading the effort in partnership with the National Radio Astronomy Observatory in Green Bank, W.Va.; the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; the Astronomical Society of the Pacific; and 4-H.

The program will train 180 4-H leaders and informal educators in Wisconsin, North Carolina, and West Virginia to engage youth participants in exploring astronomy and taking observations of planets, asteroids, galaxies and other cosmic targets using the Skynet telescope network during summer camps or weekly club meetings.

CEMSE staff members Liz Lehman, Associate Director of Science Companion projects, and Margaret Sharkey, Web Application Manager and Designer, are designing and developing a web portal that the Skynet Junior Scholars will use to plan their investigations, record their data and findings, document their data analysis and interpretation, communicate about their work with other students, and connect with astronomers.

For information about the University of Chicago Yerkes Observatory and the role it will paly in the Skynet Junior Scholars program, see “Yerkes Observatory aims for resurrection as school for astronomy,” February 13, 2013, Chicago Tribune.

Purple Asparagus App

February 8, 2013

The Center for Elementary Mathematics and Science Education (CEMSE) at the University of Chicago has partnered with Region Apps, LLC and Purple Asparagus to develop a student survey iPad app as part of a program evaluation of Purple Asparagus’ Delicious Nutritious Adventures program. The program evaluation, conducted by CEMSE, is taking place in ten CPS first grade classrooms over the 2012-13 school year. Children in participating classrooms will take the survey before and after participating in a series of monthly Purple Asparagus lessons.

Designed for children ages 5-10, the app measures students’ familiarity with a variety of fruits and vegetables, how often they eat these foods, and how willing they are to try new foods. The app also measures students’ general feelings about healthy eating, including their habits at home. To use the app, students wear headphones and listen to each question and multiple response choices, and answer using a touch screen. Students control the pace of navigating through the items, which uses photographs, colors and fonts to capture students’ interest. The survey app development was inspired by a need to accurately and efficiently learn about students’ experiences before and after the program, on a large scale, where participating students vary in their reading proficiency. The app takes about 5-10 minutes per student to complete.

The survey app was taken by 100 first grade students in December 2012 and will be administered to these students again in the spring of 2013. Students remained focused on the survey for its duration, which, depending on the student, was between five and ten minutes. Most students had previous experience using an iPad and were familiar with the touch screen. Student response to the app was very positive and many students commented that taking the survey was a fun experience.

To learn more about the student survey app or Purple Asparagus’ Delicious Nutritious Adventures program evaluation, please contact Amy Cassata at acassata@uchicago.edu.


Visualizing Data

January 31, 2013

In the world of academia, the culmination of a research project usually results in journal articles, text-heavy final reports, and perhaps a PowerPoint presentation that outlines key findings. However, these long standing forms of dissemination can no longer be seen as the only ways to share information with a broader audience.

Over the past two years, CEMSE’s Research and Evaluation team has been exploring how to use data visualization to present research findings in ways that make the work accessible to not just fellow researchers, but also to education and STEM practitioners, including the teachers and staff who participate in the research. A recent study indicates that high quality visualizations are thirty-times more likely to be engaged and shared by users than comparable text articles (Visual.ly, 2012). While the team still writes more conventional reports and publishes journal articles, they have been seizing opportunities to represent data in engaging ways, using the power of pictures, not just text, to tell stories.

In a post, Visualizing STEM, on OSLN’s STEMscape blog, CEMSE research associates Sarah Rand and Courtney Heppner, explain some of the challenges in developing visualizations for the research project: The Ohio STEM Learning Network (OSLN): A Study of Factors Affecting Implementation, Spread and Sustainability. “As we quickly learned, the process of creating a visualization involves many stages and many different skillsets. … Although we had the skills to conduct the research and analyze the data, we quickly realized our limitations when it came to representing the data and interacting with [it]. A good visualization is truly a piece of art, requiring close collaboration between data experts, designers and programmers.” To address some of these challenges, the CEMSE team works with Hannah Davis, a master’s degree student at New York University’s ITP (Interactive Telecommunications Program). To view data visualizations from this project, go to OSLN’s Facebook Album.

In the American Evaluation Association's AEA365 blog, Rand discusses the development of an infographic for a current CEMSE/UEI research project, Building an Operating System for Computer Science Education. For this project the research team used Visual.ly’s Marketplace service, which paired the researchers with a designer and a project manager to create the infographic on the current landscape of computer science professional development for high school teachers. Click here to see the infographic. CEMSE personnel, led by CEMSE’s Web Application Manager and Designer, Margaret Sharkey, then worked to prepare the report for online display.

LaForce Reviewing NSF Proposals

January 16, 2013

In January, Melanie LaForce from the Research and Evaluation group will be reviewing proposals to the Transforming STEM Learning Program at the National Science Foundation. Dr. LaForce is the Co-PI of a $1.8 million grant recently awarded through that program. The grant funds a study of the landscape of inclusive STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) high schools across the United States.

New Evaluation Projects

January 16, 2013

CEMSE's Research and Evaluation group has two new evaluations underway. One is focusing on the work of Purple Asparagus, an organization that seeks to help youth be more healthy through nutrition and health education; and the other is focused on innovative approaches to teaching Gross Anatomy at the UIC Dental School.

Jeanne Century and Sarah Rand to present at National Science Foundation's Computing Education for the 21st Century

January 11, 2013

Jeanne Century and Sarah Rand of CEMSE’s Research and Evaluation group will be presenting at National Science Foundation's Computing Education for the 21st Century PI meeting on January 15th, 2013, in Portland, Oregon. They will be presenting findings from CEMSE's study of the landscape of professional development for computer science teachers. Read more about this study here.

Enrico Fermi Summer Intern Program

September 4, 2012

Enrico Fermi Summer Intern Program reaches local students under the direction of Prof. Mark Oreglia, eleven rising eighth graders spent a week of their summer vacation on campus immersed in the world of science and technology. The young Enrico Fermi Science Interns spent their mornings in lectures and programming computers. The afternoons were devoted to hands-on fieldwork activities designed by Liz Lehman, a curriculum developer and school support services associate at the Center for Elementary Mathematics and Science Education (CEMSE).

Participants were introduced to the esoteric field of high-energy particle physics. Lauren Tompkins, a post-doctoral fellow in physics who delivered some of the lectures said, “Talking to the kids about particle physics and the Large Hadron Collider was fantastic. They were highly engaged, asking insightful questions which showed they were thinking about and processing what I was saying. Particle physics can be daunting to some people because it deals with a world of invisible objects, but these kids were eager to learn about it!” Lectures were also delivered by Mark Oreglia, a professor in physics and Joe O'Gallagher, a senior scientist at the Enrico Fermi Institute.

Under the direction of Mary Heintz, a systems administrator with the Electronics Design Group and High Energy Physics, the students created their own websites. Links to their pages can be found on the High Energy Physics Outreach page. They also programed microprocessers. These are similar to devices that control our cars or home thermostats. Students learned how control LEDs and make a speaker play different notes. The final project was to build a memory game using the skills they learned to control lights, sounds, and buttons.

Afternoons were spent in fieldwork designed by Lehman around the theme of water ecology and conservation. Investigations included identifying how water is used, measuring how much water is consumed by different uses, and experimenting with ways water can be cleaned prior to use. The students spread out through Hyde Park, collecting data on water uses in our community that was then used to create a water usage map. The water usage map can be viewed on the group’s website and includes very visible uses (e.g., landscaping irrigation) and less obvious ones (e.g., bricks used in buildings and sidewalks were made with water) that the students observed. They were regularly challenged to find ways to solve problems and gather information. For example, when measuring water usage while drinking water from a fountain, how much water makes it you’re your mouth and how much goes straight down the drain? If you’re using a toilet that doesn’t have a tank, how do you measure how much water each flush uses? This group of students can share several techniques they developed!

Students also created water filtration systems using everyday materials. The students were organized into teams and challenged to see who could make the “best” device to clean up samples of dirty water. Lehman was pleased with the their efforts, “I was amazed at how enthusiastic they were in trying to come up with the best solution. Each team took a different approach to solving the challenge and revised their ideas when the first, and sometimes second, filter didn’t meet expectations. The engineering design process really came to life!”

Prof. Oreglia started the program in 2006 as part of the ‘Broader Impacts’ requirement included in a National Science Foundation (NSF) grant. Oreglia wanted to influence youngsters who may not have really envisioned college in their future. “I really hope that this experience might encourage them to consider college and think about careers in science and technology.” The interns come from local schools including Kenwood Academy, Murray Language Academy, and Woodlawn Charter School and must be recommended by their science teachers. NSF funds cover the cost of materials, microprocessors, and incidentals.

This was the second year that Oregila’s group has partnered with CEMSE. The activities designed by Lehman and her colleagues added a new dimension to the program. “We are educators,” said Oreglia, “but Liz’s work gave us a new perspective on working with young students. We learned a lot.”

Enthusiastic participants have asked if the program could be longer or if they could come again. Oreglia said, “I really regret that we cannot extend the program because of the demands of research, but the idea of bringing back “alumni” is intriguing. I am considering inviting back students who have participated and engaging them in teaching new students.”

Everyday Mathematics featured in the Chicago Tribune

August 9, 2012

Everyday Mathematics was featured in an August 8, 2012 article in the Chicago Tribune. Access the article via the following link: http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/local/ct-x-everyday-mathematics-20120808,0,4307083.story

Two New Evaluation Projects: Zoo Explorers and Google CAPE

June 20, 2012

Two new projects have been added to the work of CEMSE’s Research and Evaluation group: The Zoo Explorers program at the Lincoln Park Zoo in Chicago and Google's Computing and Programming Experience (CAPE), a multi-week summer program conducted at Google’s Mountain View and New York City locations. Both are out-of-school programs designed to stimulate students’ interest in STEM topics.

The Zoo Explorers offers teachers, students, and chaperones a 55-minute inquiry based, focused field trip that aligns with the research of scientists at the Lincoln Park Zoo. Each field trip is facilitated by a trained zoo educator, who is supported by the classroom teacher and chaperones. Topics vary by grade level and include animal habitats, behaviors, and classification. The program seeks to provide educators and students with inquiry-based experience at the zoo and support students in building data collection and analysis skills. Visit the Zoo Explorers website for more information about the program. CEMSE will use a mixed methods based evaluation based on questions derived from the project goals. The evaluation will include elements of process evaluation and progress evaluation in addition to the summative evaluation. Data collection includes interviews, questionnaires, observations, and review of student work.

Google's Computing and Programming Experience (CAPE) is designed to inspire excitement about computer science for incoming 9th grade students. The evaluation has two strands. The first focuses on working with program leaders to clearly articulate the CAPE program model and theory of action. The second focuses on evaluation of the preparation for, and implementation of, CAPE 2012. The evaluation has both formative and summative components and will provide timely feedback to help inform the design and implementation process as well as determine CAPE’s impact, and make recommendations future improvements. CEMSE’s evaluation will focus on three main goals: (1) articulation of a clear CAPE model and development of the capacity to spread that model; (2) development of CAPE faculty capacity to facilitate CAPE experiences and teach computer science; and (3) content and attitudinal outcomes for youth. This evaluation employs a combination of qualitative and quantitative data collection methods to answer the research questions. Data sources include youth questionnaires, interviews, focus groups and product or artifact review; faculty interviews; observations of weekend summit and CAPE summer activities; and meetings and interviews with CAPE leadership. For more information about the program, visit the Google CAPE website.

Century to Address LASER STEM Institute

June 6, 2012

Jeanne Century, CEMSE Director of Research and Evaluation, will deliver the opening remarks at the Washington State LASER STEM Education Leadership Institute on Tuesday, June 26th. Her presentation will describe the current national landscape for STEM education. The following day, she will speak about CEMSE's research on sustainability of reform. For more information about the institute and Washington State LASER (Leadership and Assistance for Science Education Reform) visit the LASER website.

Renewed Funding for the Teacher Leadership Project

June 4, 2012

CEMSE and UEI were awarded funding by the Illinois Board of Higher Education to continue their Teacher Leadership for Elementary Mathematics and Science (TeLEMS) project for a third year. Thirteen Chicago public and charter schools currently participate in the project, including Donoghue and North Kenwood Oakland (NKO), the two University of Chicago charter elementary schools. Highlights for the upcoming year include a principal and teacher leadership institute for participating schools and the production of a video case study to document mathematics instruction and leadership at NKO and Donoghue.

Renewed Funding for the Teacher Leadership Project

June 4, 2012

CEMSE and UEI were awarded funding by the Illinois Board of Higher Education to continue their Teacher Leadership for Elementary Mathematics and Science (TeLEMS) project for a third year. Thirteen Chicago public and charter schools currently participate in the project, including Donoghue and North Kenwood Oakland (NKO), the two University of Chicago charter elementary schools. Highlights for the upcoming year include a principal and teacher leadership institute for participating schools and the production of a video case study to document mathematics instruction and leadership at NKO and Donoghue.

Michael Lach, Director of STEM Policy and Strategic Initiatives, Appointed to National Research Council’s Board on Science Education

May 7, 2012

Michael Lach, Director of STEM Policy and Strategic Initiatives at the University of Chicago, has been appointed to the National Research Council’s Board on Science Education. Lach will join in its efforts to improve science education in the U.S. at all levels. Lach stated,"It's a real honor to be appointed to the National Research Council's Board on Science Education. I'm looking forward to adding my perspective to the ambitious research agenda the Board has planned, and helping their efforts align with broader educational improvement efforts."

At the University, Lach directs the work related to the 100Kin10 initiative as a joint effort of the University of Chicago’s Urban Education Institute (UEI) and CEMSE. 100Kin10 is a growing alliance of more than 115 leading public, private, and non-profit organizations that have committed to strategically addressing the nation’s shortage of STEM teachers and improving STEM learning for all students by training 100,000 excellent science, technology engineering, and mathematics teachers in the next 10 years. The University of Chicago is developing a learning infrastructure for the 100Kin10 efforts, to drive the (1) improvement of 100Kin10 partner programs, (2) effectiveness of the 100Kin10 movement at large, and (3) expansion of empirical knowledge about what aspects of teacher recruitment, preparation, and support matter most.

Prior to joining the University of Chicago, Lach was special assistant to the Secretary fo Education at the U.S. Department of Education. Before his work in D.C., Lach directed the Office of Teaching and Learning for Chicago Public Schools.

Case Study on UEI/CEMSE Improving Teacher Quality Project Published

May 3, 2012

A case study written by Debbie Leslie, CEMSE Early Childhood Specialist and Director of Science Companion Projects, was recently published in a special issue of the journal Planning and Changing. This issue is focused on STEM school (P-12) and university professional development partnerships.

Titled “Seeking Symmetry in a School-University Partnership: University of Chicago and Chicago Public Schools—A Collaborative Approach to Developing Models and Tools for Professional Development and Teacher Preparation,” the case study reports on a funded project that is a joint effort by CEMSE and the University of Chicago’s Urban Education Institute (UEI). Leslie has served as the project’s director since its inception in 2007, and UEI’s Tim Knowles is the principal investigator.

The full article can be downloaded here: “Seeking Symmetry…”

For more information on the journal visit the Planning and Changing website: http://planningandchanging.illinoisstate.edu/recentarticles/volume42.shtml

Special Issue: Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) School-University
Professional Development Partnerships, Volume 42, 1 and 2 Spring/Summer 2011 (Normal: Illinois State University) pp. 120–154.

Ohio STEM Network talks to Jeanne Century

May 3, 2012

The April 2012 issue of STEMScape, a newsletter from the Ohio STEM Learning network, has a featured interview with Jeanne Century, CEMSE Director of Science Education, Research and Evaluation. Jeanne has been directing CEMSE’s work with the Ohio STEM Learning network in collaboration with the Battelle Center for Mathematics and Science Educationx' Policy (BC) at the Ohio State University. Topics Jeanne discusses in the interview include CEMSE’s support of STEM education and the work of Researchers Without Borders. Read the interview on the STEMscape website.

Century and Bates Present Papers at the AERA Annual Meeting

May 25, 2012

CEMSE staff members shared information about ongoing research and the Virtual Learning Community project at the recent annual meeting of the American Educational Research Association, held in Vancouver, British Columbia.

Jeanne Century, CEMSE Director of Science Education, Research and Evaluation, examined factors affecting education reform in her presentation, "Defining and Measuring Sustainability of Reform: Factors that Affect Our Abilities to Generate Enduring Change." Download PDF of Prezi slide presentation. The submitted paper, "Measuring Implementation, Spread, and Sustainability of Educational Innovations: Innovating for Collaborative Research," was authored by Century, along with Amy Cassata, CEMSE lead researcher, and Cassie Freeman and Mollie Rudnick, both former CEMSE research associates.

Jeanne made a second presentation at the meeting, "Understanding Implementation, Spread, and Sustainability of STEM High Schools in the Ohio STEM Learning Network." in a symposium entitled: "Understanding Emerging Opportunity Structures in STEM Education: Research Efforts to Explore School-Level Innovations." Download PDF of Prezi slide presentation.

Meg Bates, project director for the Virtual Learning Community, presented "Designing a Virtual Learning Community for Elementary Mathematics Teachers," coauthored by David Beer, PI of the project.

CEMSE Staff Co-host NSF STEM Education Meeting in Chicago

May 24, 2012

The National Science Foundation recently organized a series of regional meetings focused on improving STEM education in K-12 schools. The events, including one held in Chicago on April 10, examined issues presented in the National Research Council’s 2011 report Successful K-12 STEM Education: Identifying Effective Approaches in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics. A free PDF of the report can be downloaded at National Academies Press.

The Chicago meeting, STEM Smart: Lessons Learned from Successful Schools, was co-hosted by CEMSE and Education Development Center (EDC). A group from the University of Chicago, including Jeanne Century and Martin Gartzman of CEMSE and Michael Lach of 100K in 10, served as local liaisons for the successful Chicago event.

Martin Gartzman, CEMSE Executive Director and former Assistant Vice Chancellor for High School Development, University of Illinois at Chicago, participated in a panel presentation: UIC College Prep: Building a Strong University Partnership with a STEM High School. Also on the panel were Audrey Borling, Dean of Instruction, UIC College Prep, and Babette J. Neuberger, Associate Dean for Academic Affairs and Director of Graduate Studies, School of Public Health, University of Illinois at Chicago.

Michael Lach, Director of STEM Policy and Strategic Initiatives, Urban Education Institute and CEMSE, and Jeanne Century, CEMSE Director of Science Education, Research and Evaluation, served on the Synthesis and Discussion panel, which provided reflections on the meeting’s presentations and conversations. Other panel members were Jim Hamos (moderator), Lead Program Director, National Science Foundation; Brad Findell, Mathematics Education Consultant; and Karen King, Director of Research, National Council of Teachers of Mathematics.

AEA's Values - Walking the Talk with Maurice Samuels

May 14, 2012

The American Evaluation Association’s newsletter column, “Walking the Talk” is designed to familiarize AEA readers with its values statement, by asking members of the AEA community to contribute their own reflections on the association's values. The April issue features a response from CEMSE Research and Evaluation Associate, Maurice Samuels, who has been a member of the AEA since 2004. View the rest of the April newsletter

My name is Maurice Samuels and I conduct Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) educational evaluations as a research and evaluation associate at the Center for Elementary Mathematics and Science Education at the University of Chicago. My introduction to AEA was as an inaugural member of the Graduate Educational Diversity Internship (GEDI) Program in 2004. Since then, I have served as co-chair of the mentoring committee in the Multi-ethnic Issues in Evaluation (MIE) Topical Interest Group and have attended AEA retreats. Currently, I serve as co-chair of the MIE Topical Interest Group.

My service and commitment to AEA is a result of the organization's commitment to diversifying the evaluation profession. In particular, AEA has dedicated human and financial resources needed to make and sustain meaningful change within the evaluation field. The organization's commitment to diversity has helped to infuse the evaluation field with new insights, ideas, and knowledge on how programs are designed, implemented, and experienced by individuals and groups that are underrepresented. For me, it is AEA's commitment to inclusiveness and diversifying the field of evaluation that serves as the continuing catalyst for my service to the organization.

When I reflect on AEA's values statement, as it applies to my practice, I consider how I can include the voices of underrepresented groups in the evaluation process. For me, the inclusion of these voices is important because my evaluation practice is within the context of a large urban K-12 school district where the voices of certain stakeholder groups are often unheard, particularly in terms of decision-making processes, program improvements, and policy formulations. The statement also makes me aware of my own cultural values and how they converge or diverge from stakeholders which, in turn, shapes my relationships with stakeholders.

As an evaluator, I recognize programs are located in institutions characterized by a particular culture. As such, there are different cultural practices at the individual, group, and institutional level that can create tensions and present barriers to understanding and communication among stakeholders. Given this reality, the values statement encourages me to continuously seek out ways to share findings with stakeholders in an effective yet humane manner so that barriers can be reduced and, at the same time, an ethically defendable evaluation will be conducted.

Finally, as an evaluator from an underrepresented group, when I reflect on AEA's values statement, it encourages me to rethink ways in which I can assist AEA in its continuing efforts to attract and build the evaluation capacity of evaluation professionals from underrepresented groups.

I am truly thankful to be a member of AEA, and find it a great honor to serve the organization.

Professor Usiskin Examines Singapore's High Test Scores

April 27, 2012

UCSMP Director, Zalman Usiskin, has an article about Singapore in the current Mathematics Teacher (May 2012). Professor Usiskin explores several reasons for the success of Singaporean students on international tests. The article, "Misidentifying Factors Underlying Singapore’s High Test Scores," is available as a free preview on the NCTM website.

CEMSE and UCSMP Speakers at NCTM Conference

April 24, 2012

CEMSE and UCSMP staff members will be speaking at the National Council of Teacher’s of Mathematics annual meeting in Philadelphia, PA. CEMSE and Everyday Mathematics Senior Editor David Spangler will present “Mathematical Humor with a Point: Communicating Effectively with Students,” on Thursday, April 26 from 9:00 am to 10:00 am. David will examine how humor can allow students to gain an offbeat view of topics while reinforcing concepts. He will share anecdotes, jokes, cartoons, bad ads, and news clippings illustrating how miscommunicated math leads to ridiculous conclusions.

Professor Zalman Usiskin, UCSMP Director, will present “The Ethics of Using Advanced Technologies in a CCSSM Environment” on Thursday, April 26, 12:30 to 1:30 pm. Zalman will discuss ethical questions raised by the classroom use of computer algebra systems (CAS) and other advanced technologies. Among the questions to be discussed: Is it fair for some students to have CAS when others don't? Is it ethical to prepare students with these technologies if they are not allowed on high-stakes tests?

Also on Thursday, Denisse Thompson, UCSMP Secondary Component Director of Evaluation, is presenting: “Chapter Tests: Do They Assess What You Think They Assess?" Along with lead speaker, Patricia D. Hunsader, and co-speaker Barbara Zorin, Denisse will discuss how items on chapter tests accompanying mathematics curricula may not actually assess what a quick perusal indicates. This presentation will introduce several systematic issues with assessment items, how to analyze items to identify instances of these issues, and how to modify items to improve their effectiveness.

Lead Speaker:
Patricia D. Hunsader
Co-speakers:
Barbara Zorin and Denisse R. Thompson

From 8:30 to 10:00 am and “Classroom Assessment of the CCSS: A Multidimensional Approach” (Gr PreK-5) from 3:30 to 4:30.
Thursday, April 26, 2012: 3:30 PM-4:30 PM
107 A/B (Convention Center)
Lead Speaker:
Sarah K. Bleiler
Co-Speaker:
Denisse R. Thompson

What the Common Core Standards Mean for Your Classroom

Presentation Format: 3-5 Session
Grade Band Audience: 3 to 5, PreK to 2
Attribute: CommonCore Presentation

Have you thought about how you will align classroom assessment with the CCSS? This session will show you how to apply the SPUR (Skills, Properties, Uses, and Representations) framework to create or modify assessments that help you gauge students’ multidimensional understanding of concepts addressed in the CCSS.

Not only can you choose from hundreds of presentations that are aligned with teaching the Common Core, but you can get the latest from experts on what the Common Core means for your classroom, curriculum, and students at our presentations focused on Common Core Standards. Here are a few examples:

  • Reasoning and Sense Making: Keys to the CCSS
  • Effective Teaching is Responsive Teaching
  • Leading a CCSS Implementation: Effective Strategies and New Resources
  • Achieving Uncommon Results with the CCSS

183- The Ethics of Using Advanced Technologies in a CCSSM Environment

Thursday, April 26, 2012: 12:30 PM-1:30 PM
Ballroom B (convention Center)
Lead Speaker:
Zalman Usiskin

Using computer algebra systems (CAS) and other advanced technologies raises ethical questions in classrooms. Is it fair for some students to have CAS when others don't? Is it ethical to prepare students with these technologies if they are not allowed on high-stakes tests? The speaker will discuss these and other ethical questions.

Presentation Format: 9-12 Session
Grade Band Audience: 9-12
Attribute: CommonCore Presentation

Professor Sally Receives ICTM Life Achievement Award

December 11, 2012

UCSMP’s two directors, Paul Sally (left) and Zalman Usiskin, are now both recipients of the Illinois Council of Teachers of Mathematics (ICTM) Distinguished Life Achievement in Mathematics award. Dr. Sally received the award at an ICTM meeting held during the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics regional meeting in Chicago in November 2012. Dr. Usiskin had received the award in October 2010. Sally served as UCSMP Director from 1983 through 1987. Usiskin has been UCSMP director since 1987.

CEMSE Receives New NSF Grant to Expand STEM School Studies

November 5, 2012

The CEMSE Research and Evaluation Group at the University of Chicago has been awarded a $1.8 million grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) to study the landscape of inclusive STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) high schools across the United States. This study entitled, Identifying and Measuring the Implementation and Impact of STEM School Models, will comprehensively describe and measure models of 20 inclusive STEM high schools in 5 states (California, New York, New Mexico, Ohio, and Texas), measure the factors that affect their implementation, and examine the relationships between model components and a range of student outcomes. The study will increase the understanding of STEM high schools by describing the elements of inclusive STEM high school models and the ways these elements are put into practice. It will also help identify which elements of the schools may be related to desired student outcomes. In addition to the study findings, this project will develop a clear framework for describing STEM school models and instruments for measuring enactment of those models, identify the factors that affect implementation, and create rich descriptions of STEM school practices.

This study grows out of CEMSE’s prior work aimed at understanding the mechanisms of innovation in STEM education. CEMSE is currently in the second year of a three-year NSF-funded study that is examining factors that affect the implementation, spread, and sustainability of the Ohio STEM Learning Network (OSLN) Platform Schools Initiative. The new study will capitalize on our previously developed instruments, processes and findings in an effort to increase the understanding of inclusive STEM school models and to identify the approaches and practices present in these innovations that are related to desired student outcomes. This project’s larger sample size and our existing tool set will allow us to examine STEM school component implementation in multiple contexts, analyze how schools are affected by those contexts, examine relationships between enacted school components and a range of short- and long-term student outcomes, and provide rich descriptions of the particular components and practices that appear to be the most important.

Among the questions we seek to answer are, What are the intended components of each inclusive STEM school’s model? Which of these are unique to particular STEM schools? Which are common across the STEM schools?

What is the status of implementation of the intended components of each STEM school’s model?
What factors contribute to or inhibit the implementation of these components?
What components are most closely related to desired student outcomes in STEM schools?

The project will be led by Jeanne Century, EdD, Director of Science Education, Research, and Evaluation, and Melanie LaForce, PhD, Lead Researcher. For more information, contact Melanie LaForce at laforce@uchicago.edu.

CEMSE and UCSMP Contributions to the Study of Enacted Mathematics Curricula

November 1, 2012

We are pleased to report that Jeanne Century, Director of Science Education, Research and Evaluation at CEMSE, and Denisse Thompson, Director of Evaluation for UCSMP, have articles in Approaches to Studying the Enacted Curriculum (Information Age Publishing, 2012)the latest volume in the series Research in Mathematics Education.

The curriculum materials used in teaching mathematics have a tremendous influence on student learning, but the enactment of a given curriculum may vary greatly from classroom to classroom. Thus, studying the actual enactment of mathematics curricula has become an important area of research. This volume examines seven sets of research tools that are used to study the way mathematics curriculum materials are enacted. It includes a description of the conceptualization, development, and uses of these tools.

Denisse Thompson and Sharon Senk, both on the UCSMP secondary team, contributed "Instruments Used by the University of Chicago School Mathematics Project to Study the Enacted Curriculum." Their chapter describes the development and use of instruments used in field trials of the middle and high school UCSMP materials and how the data collected from them can provide insights for researchers and practitioners.

Jeanne Century, along with Cassie Freeman and Mollie Rudnick, both formerly of CEMSE’s research and evaluation team, wrote "Measuring Implementation of Instructional Materials to Support Conceptual Understanding and Accumulation of Knowledge." The CEMSE research and evaluation team have developed a suite of instruments that can be used at the school-district level to measure how mathematics and science curricula are being used in the classrooms. Their chapter describes the purpose, development process, and resulting instruments.

Another CEMSE and UCSMP connection found among this volume’s contributors is Kathryn Chval, who was ELL consultant for the third edition of Everyday Mathematics. She is one of the volume’s editors, and is also an author of two articles: “Developing Measures of Fidelity of Implementation for Mathematics Curriculum Materials Enactment,” and “Issues to Consider in Measuring Enactment of Curriculum Materials.”

For a detailed description and ordering information from the publisher, visit http://www.infoagepub.com/products/Approaches-to-Studying-the-Enacted-Mathematics-Curriculum.

Purple Asparagus’s Delicious Nutritious Adventures Program

October 8, 2012

CEMSE’s Research and Evaluation team will conduct an evaluation of Purple Asparagus’s Delicious Nutritious Adventures program this year. Purple Asparagus’s Delicious Nutritious Adventures program is designed to help students and their families learn better eating habits and to make simple, healthy snacks and meals. In the 2012-13 school year, program activities will take place in 18 schools in the Chicagoland area and will include: 1) monthly, one-hour hands-on nutrition classes in 2-3 classrooms per school (grades K-2), and 2) one family/caregiver nutrition workshop offered at each participating school. The focus of the evaluation is to understand student and family participation in the Delicious Nutritious Adventures program activities, and the knowledge, behavioral, and attitudinal outcomes for participating youth and their families.

With this goal in mind, the evaluation plan targets the following evaluation questions:

  1. To what extent are students and caregivers engaged in Delicious Nutritious Adventures program activities?
  2. To what extent do students exhibit different eating habits and attitudes about healthy eating before and after participation in the Delicious Nutritious Adventures program?
  3. To what extent does student knowledge about food and food preparation differ before and after the Delicious Nutritious Adventures program?
  4. To what extent does the Delicious Nutritious Adventures program support families in practicing healthy eating habits?

This evaluation will employ a combination of qualitative and quantitative data collection methods to answer the evaluation questions. A sample of 10 kindergarten and first grade classrooms and 4 family/caregiver workshops will be included in the evaluation. Students and their caregivers in these 10 classrooms will participate in beginning-of-year and end-of-year questionnaires. Two first grade classrooms will serve as case study sites, from which more in-depth information will be collected. Case study data will be collected through student focus groups and observations of Delicious Nutritious Adventures lessons. Additional information on family and caregiver participation and outcomes will be gathered through caregiver questionnaires, and family/caregiver workshop observations.

View the Purple Asparagus website.

Lead Researcher Amy Cassata and Associate Project Director Sarah Rand will be conducting the evaluation.

CEMSE Executive Director to Join Discussion on Chicago School Reform

January 31, 2013

Marty Gartzman, CEMSE Executive Director, has been invited to participate in a panel hosted by the University of Chicago Consortium on Chicago School Research (CCSR) and the Chicago Community Trust. The Symposium on Three Eras of Chicago School Reform, will be held Tuesday, December 13, 2011, from 8 to 10:30 a.m. at the University of Chicago Gleacher Center.

The symposium will discuss findings from CCSR’s recent report Trends in Chicago's Schools Across Three Eras of Reform, which tracked the results of two decades of school reform in Chicago.

The report reveals that graduation rates in the city have soared over the past 20 years, but elementary reading scores remained largely flat and elementary math scores saw only modest gains. The event will feature presentations by the report’s lead authors, followed by a panel discussion featuring CPS leadership and subject experts, who will consider the report’s implications for the next era of school reform. For more information, contact Bronwyn McDaniel, CCSR Communications and Research Manager, 773-834-0168, bmcdaniel@uchicago.edu.

Isaacs to Address Science Creativity Conference in Seoul, South Korea

November 29, 2011

CEMSE Co-Director Andy Isaacs has been invited to address the 2011 Science Creativity Annual Conference in Seoul, South Korea. The conference, sponsored by the South Korean Ministry of Education, Science and Technology and hosted by the Korea Foundation for the Advancement of Science Creativity (KOFAC), takes place November 30 through December 2. Isaacs will describe the development and management of Everyday Mathematics for an audience of researchers and authors of Korean nationwide-textbooks and will be on a panel about STEM education.

UEI and CEMSE Establish University of Chicago STEM Project as Part of 100Kin10; Former Department of Education Staffer Michael Lach to Lead

November 11, 2011

Contact:
Emily Krone
773-834-8036
ekrone@uchicago.edu

Initiative to Recruit, Develop, and Retain Excellent STEM Teachers for Public Schools Secures Nearly $20 Million in Funding; President Obama Says “Nothing is More Important”; Secretary Duncan Lauds Initiative’s “All-Hands-on-Deck Strategy”

Chicago, IL, November 8, 2011 – A former Chicago Public Schools administrator and U.S. Department of Education official has been tapped to lead the University of Chicago’s initiative to train a new generation of Science, Mathematics, Engineering, and Technology (STEM) teachers.

Michael Lach, who most recently served as special assistant for Science, Mathematics, Engineering, and Technology Education at the U. S. Department of Education, will direct the new STEM Project, a joint effort between The University of Chicago Urban Education Institute (UEI) and Center for Elementary Mathematics and Science Education (CEMSE). Prior to his stint in Washington, Lach was officer of Teaching and Learning for Chicago Public Schools, overseeing curriculum and instruction in the nation's third-largest school district. UEI Director Tim Knowles expressed confidence in Lach’s ability to spearhead the project: "Mike has a solid track record for providing visionary leadership and getting things done. He will add great value to the work at UEI and CEMSE." CEMSE Executive Director Martin Gartzman adds: “We are thrilled to bring Mike to the University - given his deep experience as a practitioner and policy maker - and we are glad to be building an even stronger connection between CEMSE and UEI.”

UEI and CEMSE have formed the new STEM Project as part of 100Kin10, a growing a multi-sector mobilization that responds to the national imperative to train 100,000 STEM teachers over the coming 10 years. It is designed as an invitation to all interested stakeholders—from federal agencies to states, museums to corporations, universities to school districts, non-profits to individuals—to look at their unique resources and assets and apply them creatively and strategically to address the nation’s shortage of excellent STEM teachers and to improve STEM learning for all students. The mission of 100Kin10 is to reverse our country’s decades-long decline in STEM subjects, to ensure that all children have the basic STEM literacy to be full participants in our economy and democracy, and to enable our country’s students to address the most pressing national and global challenges.

The movement is being led by Carnegie Corporation of New York and the Opportunity Equation. Talia Milgrom-Elcott, Program Officer with the Carnegie Corporation of New York, is a leader in this undertaking, saying: "100Kin10 is instrumental to the nation's economic future and a critical priority for President Obama and Secretary of Education Duncan. If we're to effectively tackle the dual goal of excellence and increased supply, we need a sophisticated RD platform to inform, inspire, and challenge us to learn and adapt from the best of what is out there. We are thrilled that the University of Chicago Urban Education Institute has stepped up to the plate to create this RD platform. Without it, we could never achieve 100,000 excellent STEM teachers for our nation's students." Lach will coordinate the work of the new STEM Project staff at UEI and CEMSE to vet aspiring partner organizations, establish a national selection board, and lead the research and development efforts supporting the work of organizations partnering in 100kin10.

100Kin10 partners will convene and collaborate through www.100Kin10.org, an online site designed to allow for the sharing of data and research projects on superior STEM teacher recruitment, preparation, and support. UEI and CEMSE will work with identified partners to establish a research agenda intended to identify best practices through iterative feedback from partners. Lessons learned will be widely disseminated among stakeholders and the broader public with the goal of ensuring the STEM teacher pipeline improves over time.

Secretary of Education Arne Duncan lauded the 100Kin10 initiative, saying: "President Obama and I believe that recruiting and preparing 100,000 excellent new teachers in the STEM fields is essential for our students' success in the 21st Century knowledge economy. We need an all-hands-on-deck strategy to make this happen. I applaud the work of Carnegie Corporation and the Opportunity Equation and the 80 organizations including corporations, universities, non-profits, states, and districts that are coming together under the banner of ‘100Kin10’ to provide our students with a world-class education in the STEM subjects,” (September 26, 2011).

A dozen corporate and foundation partners have created an initial funding base of nearly $20 million in pledges that can be allocated to any of the 100Kin10 partner organizations at the discretion of the funder. The new UEI and CEMSE STEM Project is supported by $500,000 in grant awards from the Carnegie Corporation of New York and the S.D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation. More information, including a complete list of partners and their commitments, is available on www.100Kin10.org.

About the University of Chicago Urban Education Institute: The mission of UEI is to create knowledge that helps produce reliably excellent schooling for children in urban America. The organization prepares outstanding urban teachers and leaders through the Urban Teacher Education Program; conducts rigorous research to improve policy and practice, anchored by the Consortium on Chicago School Research; operates four campuses of the University of Chicago Charter School, serving students across the South Side of Chicago; and provides tools, analytics and training to improve schools nationwide through UChicago Impact.

About the Center for Elementary Mathematics and Science Education: CEMSE is a Research and Development Center that resides within the Physical Sciences Division (PSD) of the University of Chicago. CEMSE continues the University of Chicago’s long-standing commitment to improving precollege education and aims to support high quality mathematics and science instruction and learning for all students. Through the development and sharing of knowledge and the creation of useful products and programs, CEMSE seeks to make a positive difference for mathematics and science instruction throughout the nation.

Virtual Learning Community membership passes 1000 members

October 5, 2011

On October 5, 2011, the 1000th educational professional joined the Virtual Learning Community, CEMSE's on-line project to provide support for elementary teachers using Everyday Mathematics. Approximately 965 teachers, staff developers, curriculum leaders, and administrators have joined the site since its alpha version went live on June 15 of this year. "We are gratified at the interest shown in the site by the Everyday Mathematics community," said project PI David Beer, Co-Director of School Support Services at CEMSE. "Teachers have told us that the site is meeting a need that has existed for some time."

Over 65% of the site members are teachers, says Beer, and another 12% are math coaches or specialists. About 11% of members are instructional leaders interested in mathematics, and the remainder are other educational professionals, university personnel, and other interested parties such as mathematics education publishers, authors of other mathematics curricular materials, and authors of mathematics education websites. "We are pleased that teachers and other educators continue to be the lion's share of site members," said Beer.

"Our next challenge," said Beer, "is encouraging teachers to return to the site and engage repeatedly with the video and documents and discuss them with other teachers. We are encouraged that about half of site visits are from repeat visitors, and that the average visitor spends between 6 and 7 minutes per visit. We are glad to see more groups forming, and now will look carefully at the content and intensity of group discussions. Some School Support Services staff have been uploading documents with compilations of the Recognizing Student Achievement activities. We recently launched a newly designed project home page and will be making several changes in the next few weeks to enhance the site. Included among these will be a new Groups features and more options for MyPage users."

The Virtual Learning Community is funded by a grant from the National Science Foundation (Grant number 1020083). CEMSE staff involved in the project include David Beer, Meg Bates, Cheryl Moran, Margaret Sharkey, Jarrett Colby, Diana Barrie, Rick Robertson, Mikhail Guzowski, and former staff member Mollie Rudnick. More information on the project can be found at http://vlc.uchicago.edu/about and at http://cemse.uchicago.edu/research-and-evaluation/research/pd-technology/.

New Projects and a STEM Education Community on Researchers Without Borders

July 6, 2011

Researchers Without Borders is a collaborative working environment facilitated by CEMSE staff where researchers and practitioners across academic institutions, disciplines, sectors, and levels of organizational structure can direct their efforts to solve shared problems, do collaborative research and development, and build productive working relationships and collaborations. A new STEM Education Community Group is up and running on Researchers Without Borders as well as two new project pages about Networks and Education and Understanding STEM Schools. Go to Researchers Without Borders to join!

CEMSE Staff Support Science Outreach

July 6, 2011

In June, CEMSE staff members Liz Lehman, Meg Bates, Mollie Rudnick, Sarah Rand, and Sarah Wille were instructors in Professor Mark Oreglia’s Enrico Fermi Institute, an outreach program offered through the Department of High Energy Physics. They worked with 18 local middle school students over the course of a week, leading inquiry-based and hands-on activities focusing on energy transfers, changes to the Earth’s surface, and exercise physiology. More information can be found at:

http://hep-outreach.uchicago.edu/2011/

Science Companion "TECHsperts"

June 14, 2011

The Science Companion team at CEMSE, in partnership with Arlington Heights, IL, School District 25, just completed a pilot of seven "technology-enhanced" Science Companion units. The 10 piloting teachers, called "TECHsperts," taught the units in Grades 1, 3, 4, and 5. They provided the CEMSE team with valuable input and feedback about how to marry technology and science in elementary school classrooms, and they will be instrumental in scaling up the use of the technology-rich units in District 25 in the 2011-2012 school year.

CEMSE Awarded IES Research Grant

June 14, 2011

CEMSE's Dae Kim, Amy Cassata, and Jeanne Century have been awarded a $979,500 three-year education research grant from the Institute of Education Sciences (IES). The grant will fund research focused on expanding and validating a set of existing instruments for measuring the fidelity of implementation of science and mathematics instructional materials.

The instruments were developed by CEMSE staff through a prior research project (2007-2010) funded by the National Science Foundation, "Applied Research on Science Materials Implementation: Bringing Measurement of Fidelity of Implementation to Scale." The CEMSE team developed, pilot tested, field tested, and revised a suite of instruments for measuring the fidelity of implementation of six reform-based K-8 science and mathematics instructional materials programs.

The present IES-funded study continues to establish validity and reliability within and across three of these instruments. They are the classroom-level Teacher Instructional Questionnaire, Classroom Observation Protocol, and Teacher Instructional Log. The team will also be developing a student questionnaire to complement the existing instruments.

CEMSE Selects 2011 EM Summer Fellows

June 8, 2011

CEMSE will welcome seven Everyday Mathematics Summer Fellows to the center in June and July. These highly qualified elementary mathematics educators will work with the Everyday Mathematics team on curriculum updates and improvements. CEMSE looks forward to their contributions this summer.

2011 EM Summer Fellows

Emily Ellingson, 4th- and 5th-grade teacher and former EM instructional specialist from San Francisco

Mary Freytag, EM curriculum consultant from Wisconsin

Emmi Korzynski, 5th-grade teacher from California

Jennie Magiera, 4th- and 5th-grade teacher and current Apple Distinguished Educator from Chicago

Linda Santoro, Math/Science/Gifted specialist from Connecticut

Jackie Simons, EM consultant (since 1996) from California

Penny Williams, STEM Teaching and Instructional Trainer from Alaska

Possible R D Efforts in Chicago

June 7, 2011

CEMSE researchers Sarah Rand and Amy Cassata to visit the Academy for Global Citizenship in Chicago to explore partnering on research and development efforts.

Century on Fidelity of Implementation

June 7, 2011

Jeanne Century presented on fidelity of implementation and sustaining innovations at the UTeach Annual Institute in Austin, TX on May 26th, 2011.

Lehman coordinator for CPS committee on Instruction, Assessment, and Professional Community

May 6, 2011

CEMSE researcher Elizabeth Lehman served as Workgroup Coordinator for a Chicago Public Schools (CPS) committee on Instruction, Assessment, and Professional Community that developed recommendations for a recently released CPS education blueprint, "Elevating our Vision for Learning: Improving Schools for All,” which was released April 27. CEMSE Executive Director Martin Gartzman served as Lead co-Chair for the Instruction, Assessment, and Professional Community Workgroup and also served as a member of the External Advisory Committee that helped develop the report.

Usiskin and Isaacs to discuss Common Core State Standards

May 6, 2011

UCSMP Director Zalman Usiskin and CEMSE Director Andy Isaacs will be on a panel at the "Critical Issues in Mathematics Education 2011: Mathematical Education of Teachers" meeting to be held May 11 through May 13 at the Mathematical Sciences Research Institute (MSRI) in Berkeley, California. The charge to the panel is a discussion of curriculum and teacher education in light of the Common Core State Standards.

Century spearheads development of draft guidelines for STEM education

May 6, 2011

Jeanne Century, CEMSE Director of Science Education and Research Evaluation, spearheaded the development of draft guidelines for STEM education in Grades Pre-K through 8. Century presented the framework to a meeting convened by the Illinois Business Roundtable on April 28 at Chicago's Museum of Science and Industry. CEMSE researchers Sarah Rand and Elizabeth Lehman, and CEMSE Executive Director Martin Gartzman, co-authored the recommendations with Century and participated in the state-wide working group that helped develop them.

Denise Porter and David Beer to head CEMSE's School Support Services

May 6, 2011

Denise Porter and David Beer have been appointed co-directors of CEMSE’s School Support Services. Both are long time CEMSE staff members, with broad experience in the field of elementary education. Under their leadership, the School Support Service group will expand its support for teachers and administrators, looking to develop new models for professional development support, in particular new models for online professional development.

For more than a decade, Denise Porter has been providing professional development to administrators, teachers, and parents in many school districts including those in the Chicago area, California, and Hawaii. She has worked on the development of Everyday Mathematics beginning with the first edition. Prior to her new assignment, Porter was the author and team leader for Grade 5 of the Common Core State Standards edition of Everyday Mathematics. Porter also was teacher in residence for Everyday Mathematics Grade Six, third edition, and author for various state editions. Porter holds a Bachelor of Science degree in elementary education from Iowa State University, and a Master of Education degree from the University of Houston.

David Beer joined CEMSE as ethnographic evaluator in 2003. He provided 5 years of strategic consulting support to the New York City Department of Education during its implementation of Everyday Mathematics. He was co-leader of the Early Childhood team for the 3rd Edition of Everyday Mathematics and director of the field test of the 3rd Edition of Everyday Mathematics for Pre-Kindergarten. In addition to his responsibilities for School Support Services, Beer is leading a National Science Foundation-funded project that teams CEMSE personnel and practicing teachers to develop online support for teaching Everyday Mathematics.

CEMSE meets with NSF Program Officers

April 20, 2011

Jeanne Century will be conducting a brown bag lunch for 20 Program Officers of the National Science Foundation on Tuesday, April 26th. She will be sharing with them her work on Fidelity of Implementation, including an overview of the conceptual framework and instruments developed, examples of how the work was disseminated and has spread, and suggested next steps for a research agenda.

Recent Presentations by CEMSE Staff

April 14, 2011

David Beer, Meg Bates, Dae Kim. "Using Curriculum Research to Tailor Professional Development," Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Education Research Association, April 9, 2011, New Orleans, Louisiana.

We've moved

April 14, 2011

In late March, CEMSE relocated to the newly created CEMSE-UCSMP Center, 1225 E. 60th St., along the south edge of the University of Chicago's historic Midway Plaisance. The new Center occupies the second and third floors of the renovated Mott Building. The CEMSE-UCSMP Center provides a shared home for all CEMSE projects and the Secondary Component of the University of Chicago School Mathematics Project (UCSMP)—reuniting UCSMP's elementary and secondary components in the same building. In addition to offices, the Center includes conference rooms and a state-of-the-art training facility (still under construction) that will host on-site and online meetings and professional development workshops.

New CEMSE Executive Director

April 14, 2011

Martin Gartzman joined the CEMSE staff in January as the Center's Executive Director. Gartzman comes to CEMSE from the University of Illinois at Chicago's Office of High School Development and its Learning Sciences Research Institute. He also previously served as the Chicago Public Schools' Chief Mathematics and Science Officer, where he spearheaded development of the district's highly touted Chicago Math and Science Initiative.

Jeanne Century Honored

April 14, 2011

Jeanne Century, CEMSE's Director of Science Education, Research, and Evaluation, recently received the National Association for Research in Science Teaching's 2011 JRST Award for her paper titled: "Inquiry-based science instruction—what is it and does it matter? Results from a research synthesis years 1984 to 2002," which she co-authored with Daphne D. Minner and Abigail Jurist Levy of the Education Development Center. The award recognizes the paper's selection as the most significant publication from among all papers published in the Journal of Research in Science Teaching during 2010.

CEMSE Staff Authors Chapter in Book on Science Education Leadership

March 22, 2010

CEMSE staff member Jeanne Century has authored the first chapter of a new book called Science Education Leadership: Best Practices for the New Century just published by NSTA Press. This book is a collaboration of the National Science Teachers Association (NSTA) and the National Science Education Leadership Association (NSELA) and shares the research, ideas, insights, and experiences of a wide range of individuals, ranging from science teachers to science supervisors to university personnel to those who work for agencies representing the science education field.

CEMSE Article in Science Educator

October 23, 2008

CEMSE's Jeanne Century, Molly Rudnick, and Cassie Freeman have an article in the Fall issue of Science Educator. Science Educator is a peer-reviewed journal published by the National Science Education Leadership Association. The article builds off of CEMSE's NSF funded project that focuses on developing measures for fidelity of implementation of instructional materials. The authors propose an approach to adapting the conceptual framework underlying the fidelity work and applying it to create a model for studying the roles and impacts of various science specialist models. You can view the article here: Accumulating Knowledge on Elementary Science Specialists: A Strategy for Building Conceptual Clarity and Sharing Findings

CEMSE Participates in Science Chicago

October 1, 2007

"This year some of the most exciting scientific discoveries at the University of Chicago...will be made by kids."

The University of Chicago is a proud partner in Science Chicago – the world’s largest science celebration! Science Chicago gives us the opportunity to open our doors to kids of all ages to let them discover for themselves just how amazing science really is. This ambitious year-long event aims to help establish the critical value of science and math education, while illustrating that science isn’t just what’s learned in a classroom or labit happens all around us and has real impact on our daily lives.

In September, CEMSE participated in LABFEST! at the Museum of Science and Industry. The day included many interactive and inspiring hands-on activities, demonstrations, and experiments. Activities included exploring light and color through rainbows, building a model solar system, using air cannons to explore air density, decoding your own secret messages, and hands-on fun exploring the four forces of flightlift, gravity, drag, and thrust.

"Science Education for Kids in the 21st Century” on November 16th and 23rd –

As part of Science Chicago, Jeanne Century, Director of Science Education and Research and Evaluation, and Debbie Leslie, Director of Direct Services for Science and Early Childhood, will engage parents in two interactive discussions about "What is good science education for your kids for the 21st Century?" The discussions will center on the importance of high-quality science education and what parents should expect their children to know and be able to do in science starting as early as preschool. On November 16 from 6:00 pm – 7:00 pm, and November 23 from 7:00 pm – 8:30 pm. Located at Uncommon Ground, 1401 West Devon Avenue, Chicago.

Science Chicago runs from September 2008 - August 2009. For more information about Science Chicago and for a full calendar of events, please visit the Science Chicago website as well as the University of Chicago website devoted to Science Chicago.

IBHE awards University grant to support Professional Development Schools

September 19, 2007

The Illinois Board of Higher Education has awarded the University a grant to support work in three Professional Development Schools, two University charter schools (North Kenwood / Oakland and Donoghue) and the National Teachers Academy, a neighborhood school operated by the Chicago Public Schools (CPS). The annually renewable grant, totaling approximately $1 million over three years, will enable CEMSE and the Center for Urban School Improvement to work closely with the three Professional Development Schools (PDSs) to strengthen mathematics and science instruction. A key goal of the project will be to disseminate its effects beyond the PDSs, first to a network of six CPS partnership schools and then across the entire CPS. Tim Knowles of the Center for Urban School Improvement (USI) is Principal Investigator and CEMSE’s Debbie Leslie (daleslie@uchicago.edu) is Project Director. See the project synopsis for further details.

Everyday Mathematics Restructuring School Project enters its second year

September 19, 2007

CEMSE has begun its second year helping to improve mathematics achievement at 10 Chicago public elementary schools that are undergoing restructuring mandated by the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB). CEMSE is providing in-school support to full time Mathematics In-School Instructional Coaches (MISICS) in each of the ten schools and also Data-Based Technical Assistance (DBTA) to leaders in the 10 schools and Chicago Public Schools (CPS) administrators. The project began in the 2006-2007 school year with an annual funding of approximately $1 million, and is expected to continue for several more years. Andy Isaacs (aisaacs@uchicago.edu) is Principal Investigator for the project; David Beer (dwbeer@uchicago.edu) and Jeanne Century co-direct the DBTA; and Cheryl Moran (cgmoran@uchicago.edu) directs the support for the mathematics coaches. The project also includes Mary Jo Tavormina of CPS's Office of Mathematics and Science and Xavier Botana of the Office of NCLB Accountability.

Everyday Mathematics 4 New User Training - Grade 5 and 6

  • Jul 23, 2015, 8:30am - 3:30am

CEMSE is pleased to announce that we will be offering professional development sessions this July for new users of Everyday Mathematics 4. The trainings are 1-day in length.

The Everyday Mathematics 4 New User Professional Development sessions will focus on effective implementation strategies for Everyday Mathematics4 with an emphasis on the CCSS-M Content Standards and the Standards for Mathematical Practice. The session with include a discussion of the components of the program, management tips, manipulative use, classroom organization, routines, games, assessment, differentiation, pedagogy, digital resources, and math content.

Learn more and register here.

Everyday Mathematics 4 New User Training - Grade 4

  • Jul 22, 2015, 8:30am - 3:30am

CEMSE is pleased to announce that we will be offering professional development sessions this July for new users of Everyday Mathematics 4. The trainings are 1-day in length.

The Everyday Mathematics 4 New User Professional Development sessions will focus on effective implementation strategies for Everyday Mathematics4 with an emphasis on the CCSS-M Content Standards and the Standards for Mathematical Practice. The session with include a discussion of the components of the program, management tips, manipulative use, classroom organization, routines, games, assessment, differentiation, pedagogy, digital resources, and math content.

Learn more and register here.

Everyday Mathematics 4 New User Training - Grade 3

  • Jul 21, 2015, 8:30am - 3:30am

CEMSE is pleased to announce that we will be offering professional development sessions this July for new users of Everyday Mathematics 4. The trainings are 1-day in length.

The Everyday Mathematics 4 New User Professional Development sessions will focus on effective implementation strategies for Everyday Mathematics4 with an emphasis on the CCSS-M Content Standards and the Standards for Mathematical Practice. The session with include a discussion of the components of the program, management tips, manipulative use, classroom organization, routines, games, assessment, differentiation, pedagogy, digital resources, and math content.

Learn more and register here.

Everyday Mathematics 4 New User Training - Grade 2

  • Jul 20, 2015, 8:30am - 3:30am

CEMSE is pleased to announce that we will be offering professional development sessions this July for new users of Everyday Mathematics 4. The trainings are 1-day in length.

The Everyday Mathematics 4 New User Professional Development sessions will focus on effective implementation strategies for Everyday Mathematics4 with an emphasis on the CCSS-M Content Standards and the Standards for Mathematical Practice. The session with include a discussion of the components of the program, management tips, manipulative use, classroom organization, routines, games, assessment, differentiation, pedagogy, digital resources, and math content.

Learn more and register here.

Everyday Mathematics 4 New User Training - Grade 1

  • Jul 16, 2015, 8:30am - 3:30am

CEMSE is pleased to announce that we will be offering professional development sessions this July for new users of Everyday Mathematics 4. The trainings are 1-day in length.

The Everyday Mathematics 4 New User Professional Development sessions will focus on effective implementation strategies for Everyday Mathematics4 with an emphasis on the CCSS-M Content Standards and the Standards for Mathematical Practice. The session with include a discussion of the components of the program, management tips, manipulative use, classroom organization, routines, games, assessment, differentiation, pedagogy, digital resources, and math content.

Learn more and register here.

Everyday Mathematics 4 New User Training - Kindergarten

  • Jul 15, 2015, 8:30am - 3:30am

CEMSE is pleased to announce that we will be offering professional development sessions this July for new users of Everyday Mathematics 4. The trainings are 1-day in length.

The Everyday Mathematics 4 New User Professional Development sessions will focus on effective implementation strategies for Everyday Mathematics4 with an emphasis on the CCSS-M Content Standards and the Standards for Mathematical Practice. The session with include a discussion of the components of the program, management tips, manipulative use, classroom organization, routines, games, assessment, differentiation, pedagogy, digital resources, and math content.

Learn more and register here.

Communicating with Parents about the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics and the PARCC Mathematics Assessments: An “On the Table” Discussion

  • May 12, 2015, 5:00pm - 7:00pm

Date: May 12, 2015
Time: 5–7PM
Location: University of Chicago, Center for Elementary Mathematics and Science Education, 1225 E. 60th St.
For: School and district administrators, mathematics teacher-leaders
Cost: No charge for the event; dinner is included; free parking nearby
RSVP: Send note to jfragoso@uchicago.edu; attendance is limited to the first 35 individuals who RSVP

Event Background and Description

In celebration of its 100th anniversary on May 12, the Chicago Community Trust has challenged Chicago-area leaders in many fields to participate in a set of “On the Table” discussions across the region on May 12 about how to make the Chicago area the most vibrant metropolitan region in the nation. This includes discussions about education, where the Trust has supported a wide range of ground-breaking programs.

As part of the May 12 events, the University of Chicago’s Center for Elementary Mathematics and Science Education (CEMSE) and the University of Illinois Learning Sciences Research Institute are inviting some of the area’s most thoughtful school leaders to participate in a special, education-focused On the Table discussion. We invite you to join 35 thought leaders—from schools and districts that have been working actively to improve their mathematics instruction—to an On the Table event that will address an issue that has taken on greater importance this past year: how to best communicate with parents about the Common Core Standards for Mathematics (CCSS-M) and the PARCC mathematics assessments.

The May 12 event will engage leading school administrators and teacher leaders in thinking together about different strategies for educating parents about the CCSS-M and the PARCC mathematics assessments. Two short presentations will help frame the On the Table discussions:

  • Martin Gartzman, CEMSE Executive Director, will highlight the essential challenges facing schools and districts in educating parents about the CCSS-M and PARCC assessments.
  • Sheila Lettiere, District 123 Math Coordinator, will describe her district’s Parent University program about the CCSS-M.

Following the presentations, participants will engage in a free-flowing, dinner discussion in small groups—where they share ideas, discuss challenges, raise questions, and brainstorm strategies for providing parents with opportunities to learn about the CCSS-M and PARCC assessments and the implications for their children’s experiences in mathematics classrooms. A whole-group discussion will follow. The goal is for participants to learn from each other and serve as thought partners regarding parent education efforts about the CCSS-M and PARCC assessments. Participants are likely to leave the event with new ideas and potential new partners for addressing these concerns.

Contact mgartzman@uchicago.edu or 773-834-0023 for questions for further information.

Summer Everyday Math User's Conference - San Francisco

  • Aug 6, 2015, 8:30am - 4:00pm

The Everyday Mathematics User Conference in San Francisco will be held from August 6-7 at The InterContinental Hotel.

REGISTER TODAY

Summer Everyday Math User's Conference - Boston

  • Aug 3, 2015, 8:30am - 4:00pm

The Everyday Mathematics User Conference in Boston will be held from August 3-4 at the Hyatt Boston Harbor.

REGISTER TODAY

Summer Everyday Math User's Conference - Chicago

  • Jul 27, 2015, 8:30am - 4:00pm

The Everyday Mathematics User Conference in Chicago will be held from July 27-28 at Hyatt Regency Chicago.

REGISTER TODAY

CEMSE authors Gina Kling and Jennifer Bay-Williams presenting at NCTM

  • Apr 17, 2015, 8:00am - 9:15am

April 13–April 17, CEMSE authors will be presenting at the National Council of Supervisors of Mathematics (NCSM) annual conference, the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) Research Conference, and the NCTM annual conference.

At NCTM:

Friday, 8:00 AM - 9:15 AM
Gina Kling and Jennifer Bay-Williams
“Developing and Assessing Addition Fact Fluency”

CEMSE authors Andy Isaacs and Debbie Leslie presenting at NCTM

  • Apr 16, 2015, 12:30pm - 1:30pm

April 13–April 17, CEMSE authors will be presenting at the National Council of Supervisors of Mathematics (NCSM) annual conference, the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) Research Conference, and the NCTM annual conference.

At NCTM:

Thursday, 12:30PM - 1:30PM
Andy Isaacs and Debbie Leslie
“Desirable Difficulties: Is easier always better?”

CEMSE authors Gina Kling and Amanda Ruch presenting at NCTM

  • Apr 16, 2015, 9:45am - 11:00am

April 13–April 17, CEMSE authors will be presenting at the National Council of Supervisors of Mathematics (NCSM) annual conference, the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) Research Conference, and the NCTM annual conference.

At NCTM:

Thursday, 9:45 AM - 11:00 AM
Gina Kling and Amanda Ruch
“Meaningful Learning and Practice: Multiplication Fact Strategies that Build Fluency”

CEMSE authors Alison Whittington, Ava Chatterjee, and Barbara Molina presenting at NCSM

  • Apr 15, 2015, 2:15pm

April 13–April 17, CEMSE authors will be presenting at the National Council of Supervisors of Mathematics (NCSM) annual conference, the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) Research Conference, and the NCTM annual conference.

At NCSM:

Wednesday, 2:15 PM
Session 354: Alison Whittington, Ava Chatterjee, and Barbara Molina
“Building Language Capacity for Access and Higher Levels of Communication in Mathematics”

CEMSE authors Zalman Usiskin and Meg Bates presenting at NCTM

  • Apr 14, 2015, 10:00am - 11:15am

April 13–April 17, CEMSE authors will be presenting at the National Council of Supervisors of Mathematics (NCSM) annual conference, the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) Research Conference, and the NCTM annual conference.

At NCTM:

Tuesday, 10:00am - 11:15am
Zalman Usiskin and Meg Bates
"Research on the Digital Revolution in Mathematics Curriculum, Teaching and Learning"

CEMSE authors Sara Burnworth, Eliza Bryant, Denise Porter, and Amanda Zimolzak presenting at NCSM

  • Apr 14, 2015, 2:15pm

April 13–April 17, CEMSE authors will be presenting at the National Council of Supervisors of Mathematics (NCSM) annual conference, the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) Research Conference, and the NCTM annual conference.

At NCSM:

Tuesday, 2:15 PM
Session 267: Sara Burnworth, Eliza Bryant, Denise Porter, and Amanda Zimolzak
“Supporting Effective Technology Usage and Integration to Enhance Engagement and Growth in Mathematics Learning”

CEMSE authors Alison Whittington and Debbie Leslie presenting at NCSM

  • Apr 14, 2015, 8:45am

April 13–April 17, CEMSE authors will be presenting at the National Council of Supervisors of Mathematics (NCSM) annual conference, the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) Research Conference, and the NCTM annual conference.

At NCSM:

Tuesday, 8:45 AM
Session 216: Alison Whittington and Debbie Leslie
“Shared Vision, Leadership, Collaboration: Building the Capacity of School Leadership Teams to Effect Meaningful Change”

CEMSE authors Alison Whittington and Amanda Zimolzak presenting at NCSM

  • Apr 13, 2015, 1:30pm

April 13–April 17, CEMSE authors will be presenting at the National Council of Supervisors of Mathematics (NCSM) annual conference, the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) Research Conference, and the NCTM annual conference.

At NCSM:

Monday, 1:30 PM
Session 142: Alison Whittington and Amanda Zimolzak
“Supporting Reflective Teaching and Meaningful Collaboration Through Various Collaborative Coaching Structures”

CEMSE authors Katie Flores, Sisa Renie, and Denise Porter presenting at NCSM

  • Apr 13, 2015, 12:15pm

April 13–April 17, CEMSE authors will be presenting at the National Council of Supervisors of Mathematics (NCSM) annual conference, the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) Research Conference, and the NCTM annual conference.

At NCSM:

Monday, 12:15 PM
Session 124: Katie Flores, Sisa Renie, and Denise Porter
“Supporting Teacher Collaboration in Implementing Open Response Problems and Planning Reengagement Discussions”

CEMSE authors Amanda Ruch, Gina Kling, and Ellen Dairyko presenting at NCTM

  • Apr 12, 2014, 9:45am-11:00am

April 7–April 12, UCSMP authors will be presenting at the National Council of Supervisors of Mathematics (NCSM) annual conference, the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) Research Conference, and the NCTM annual conference.

At NCTM:

Saturday, 9:45 – 11:00 AM
Session 617: Amanda Ruch, Gina Kling and Ellen Dairyko
“Helping Children Master Multiplication Facts in a Meaningful Way”

CEMSE authors Andy Isaacs and Rebecca Maxcy presenting at NCTM

  • Apr 11, 2014, 11:00am-12:00pm

April 7–April 12, UCSMP authors will be presenting at the National Council of Supervisors of Mathematics (NCSM) annual conference, the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) Research Conference, and the NCTM annual conference.

At NCTM:

Friday, 11:00 AM – 12:00 noon
Exhibition Workshop: Andy Isaacs and Rebecca Maxcy
“Seeing the Spiral: How Everyday Mathematics Aligns with CCSS”

CEMSE authors Liesje Spaepen, Katie Flores, and Amanda Ruch presenting at NCTM

  • Apr 11, 2014, 9:45am-11:00am

April 7–April 12, UCSMP authors will be presenting at the National Council of Supervisors of Mathematics (NCSM) annual conference, the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) Research Conference, and the NCTM annual conference.

At NCTM:

Friday, 9:45 – 11:00 AM
Session 362: Liesje Spaepen, Katie Flores, Amanda Ruch
“Embedding Enrichment in Math Instruction for Primary Children”

CEMSE author Zalman Usiskin presenting at NCTM

  • Apr 11, 2014, 9:30am-10:30m

April 7–April 12, UCSMP authors will be presenting at the National Council of Supervisors of Mathematics (NCSM) annual conference, the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) Research Conference, and the NCTM annual conference.

At NCTM:

Friday, 9:30 – 10:30 AM
Session 336: Zalman Usiskin
"What Changes Should Be Made for the Next Edition of the CCSSM"

CEMSE authors John Benson, Andy Carter, and Amanda Ruch presenting at NCTM

  • Apr 11, 2014, 8:00am-9:15am

April 7–April 12, UCSMP authors will be presenting at the National Council of Supervisors of Mathematics (NCSM) annual conference, the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) Research Conference, and the NCTM annual conference.

At NCTM:

Friday, 8:00 – 9:15 AM
Session 318: John Benson, Andy Carter, and Amanda Ruch
"Student-Friendly Rubrics: Connecting Open-Response Tasks to Mathematical Practices"

CEMSE authors Denise Porter and Rebecca Maxcy presenting at NCTM

  • Apr 10, 2014, 3:30pm-4:30pm

April 7–April 12, UCSMP authors will be presenting at the National Council of Supervisors of Mathematics (NCSM) annual conference, the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) Research Conference, and the NCTM annual conference.

At NCTM:

Thursday 3:30 – 4:30 PM
Exhibit workshop: Denise Porter and Rebecca Maxcy
“Virtual Learning Community: Uniting Everyday Mathematics Teachers”

UCSMP author Steve Viktora presenting at NCTM

  • Apr 10, 2014, 2:00pm-3:00pm

April 7–April 12, UCSMP authors will be presenting at the National Council of Supervisors of Mathematics (NCSM) annual conference, the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) Research Conference, and the NCTM annual conference.

At NCTM:

Thursday, 2:00 - 3:00 PM
Session 222: Steve Viktora
"A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Formula"

CEMSE author Denisse Thompson presenting at NCTM

  • Apr 10, 2014, 2:00pm-3:00pm

April 7–April 12, UCSMP authors will be presenting at the National Council of Supervisors of Mathematics (NCSM) annual conference, the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) Research Conference, and the NCTM annual conference.

At NCTM:

Thursday, 2:00 - 3:00 PM
Session 220: Denisse Thompson
"Reasoning in the Middle Grades: It's Easier Than You Think"

UCSMP author Nancy Powell presenting at NCTM

  • Apr 10, 2014, 11:30am-12:00pm

April 7–April 12, UCSMP authors will be presenting at the National Council of Supervisors of Mathematics (NCSM) annual conference, the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) Research Conference, and the NCTM annual conference.

At NCTM:

Thursday, 11:30 AM - 12:00 PM
Session 147: Nancy Powell
"Real Math + Students = Engagement"

CEMSE authors Denise Porter and Eliza Bryant presenting at NCSM

  • Apr 9, 2014, 8:45am-9:45am

April 7–April 12, UCSMP authors will be presenting at the National Council of Supervisors of Mathematics (NCSM) annual conference, the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) Research Conference, and the NCTM annual conference.

At NCSM:

Wednesday, 8:45 – 9:45 AM
Session 307: Denise Porter, Eliza Bryant
“Differentiated Professional Development (PD): Providing High Quality Supports Through a Balanced PD Model”

CEMSE authors including Denisse Thompson presenting at NCTM Research Conference

  • Apr 9, 2014, 1:14pm-2:30pm

April 7–April 12, UCSMP authors will be presenting at the National Council of Supervisors of Mathematics (NCSM) annual conference, the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) Research Conference, and the NCTM annual conference.

At the NCTM Research Conference:

Wednesday, 1:14 – 2:30 PM
Session 147: Denisse Thompson (and others)
"The Teacher's Role in Formative Assessment: Finland, Canada, and U.S.”

UCSMP author Steve Viktora presenting at NCSM

  • Apr 8, 2014, 2:30pm-3:30pm

April 7–April 12, UCSMP authors will be presenting at the National Council of Supervisors of Mathematics (NCSM) annual conference, the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) Research Conference, and the NCTM annual conference.

At NCSM:

Tuesday, 2:30 - 3:30 PM
Session 263: Steve Viktora
"Using 'Situations' to Improve Teachers' Mathematical Content Knowledge"

CEMSE authors Megan Schleppenbach-Bates and Cheryl Moran presenting at NCSM

  • Apr 8, 2014, 10:00am-11:00am

April 7–April 12, UCSMP authors will be presenting at the National Council of Supervisors of Mathematics (NCSM) annual conference, the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) Research Conference, and the NCTM annual conference.

At NCSM:

Tuesday, 10:00 – 11:00 AM
Session 222: Megan Schleppenbach-Bates, Cheryl Moran
“Using a Virtual Learning Community for Customized Professional Development”

CEMSE authors Alison Whittington and Denise Porter presenting at NCSM

  • Apr 8, 2014, 8:45am-9:45am

April 7–April 12, UCSMP authors will be presenting at the National Council of Supervisors of Mathematics (NCSM) annual conference, the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) Research Conference, and the NCTM annual conference.

At NCSM:

Tuesday, 8:45 – 9:45 AM
Session 209: Alison Whittington, Denise Porter
“Collaborative Coaching: Working Together to Support Meaningful Teacher Collaboration and Reflective Teaching”

CEMSE authors including Denisse Thompson presenting at NCTM Research Conference

  • Apr 7, 2014, 5:45pm-6:45pm

April 7–April 12, UCSMP authors will be presenting at the National Council of Supervisors of Mathematics (NCSM) annual conference, the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) Research Conference, and the NCTM annual conference.

At the NCTM Research Conference:

Monday, 5:45 – 6:45 PM
Session 18: Denisse Thompson (and others)
"Test Item Analysis and Modification: Implications of Teacher Perceptions”

October 24th Dinner Symposium for Illinois School Leaders

  • Oct 24, 2013, 5:00pm-8:00pm

Tinley Park Convention Center, Tinley Park, IL.

On the evening of Thursday, October 24, the Illinois Science Teachers Association (ISTA), and the Chicago STEM Education Consortium (C-STEMEC) will host a special free Dinner Symposium for school and district administrators, policy leaders, and education reformers about STEM education. As a C-STEMEC member CEMSE encourages all interested parties to attend.

Details: October 24, 2013, 5:00 PM to 8:00 PM


Location: Tinley Park Convention Center, Tinley Park, IL.

Audience: school administrators, policy leaders, and education reformers.

Cost: free, but pre-registration is required
.

Registration: Online at https://stemforiladmins.eventbrite.com. Note–Those who will be attending the ISEC13 Conference must also register separately at http://www.ista-il.org/conference.htm.

Panel on NSF Merit Review

  • Jan 18, 2013, 4:30pm-5:30pm

Henry Hinds Laboratory for Geophysical Sciences
5734 South Ellis Avenue
Chicago, IL 60637

On January 18th, Jeanne Century of the Research and Evaluation group will be part of a panel assembled to help University of Chicago Physical Sciences Division faculty understand the new National Science Foundation merit review criteria. The panel will be 4:30 – 5:30 in Room 101 of the Henry Hinds Laboratory for Geophysical Sciences, 5734 South Ellis Avenue Chicago, IL 60637.

Everyday Mathematics New User Sessions

  • Feb 2, 2013, 8:00am-3:00pm

Stowe Elementary School
3444 West Wabansia Avenue
Chicago, IL 60647

Everyday Mathematics New User Sessions

CEMSE is offering Everyday Mathematics workshops for new users. These sessions are intended for teachers who are either new to Everyday Mathematics or teaching a new grade level of the curriculum.

Saturday, February 2, 2013 – Day 3 of 4

Everyday Mathematics Kindergarten–Grade 5: These are continuing sessions for new users of K–5 Everyday Mathematics (days 1 and 2 were presented earlier in the academic year). The workshops emphasize components, routines, management tips, manipulative use, classroom organization, games, assessment, differentiation, pedagogy, and math content, within the context of upcoming units.

We will also discuss preparing students for ISAT and Common Core State Standards testing, as well as using Everyday Mathematics technology resources. It is not a requirement that you have attended any of the previous sessions.

Everyday Mathematics Special Education Grades K–5: These are continuing sessions focused on providing new-user, special education K–5 teachers with strategies to differentiate instruction, management tips, classroom organization, games, and assessment. It is not a requirement that you have attended any of the previous sessions.

Location: Stowe Elementary School, 3444 West Wabansia Avenue, Chicago, IL 60647

Time: Breakfast at 8:00 a.m. to 8:30 a.m. Workshop at 8:30 a.m. to 3:00 p.m.

Cost: $100.00 per one-day session per participant.

The price includes a light breakfast and lunch. All grade level sessions are limited to 35 participants. A minimum of 15 participants is needed for each grade level session or the session will be cancelled. If a session is cancelled you will receive a full refund.

Payment: Credit card payment is the only option. We are unable to accept POs or checks.

CPDUs will be awarded upon completion.

Questions: Contact Denise Porter, CEMSE Director of School Support Services, at porterd@uchicago.edu or call 773-834-0060

Registration: Session 3 of 4: Saturday, February 2, 2013 http://em1213feb2.eventbrite.com

Researchers Without Borders WebinarWhat is a STEM School? How do STEM Schools Spread and Last?

  • Jul 17, 2012, 1:00pm-2:00pm

For more information visit researcherswithoutborders.org/events
Register for this webinar

Learn about the current landscape of STEM education and our work in STEM at the Center for Elementary Mathematics and Science Education (CEMSE) at the University of Chicago. In this interactive webinar, we will share resources for STEM schools, hubs, and state networks and provide an opportunity for discussion and questions.

Everyday Mathematics2012 Everyday Mathematics National User Conference

  • Jul 30, 2012, 12:30pm-4:30pm
  • Jul 31, 2012, 8:30pm-4:30pm
  • Aug 1, 2012, 8:30pm-12:30pm

Millennium Knickerbocker Hotel
163 East Walton Place
Chicago, IL 60611

Sessions include grade-specific initial training for teachers, coaches and others new to Everyday Mathematics (EM); training that goes “Beyond the First Year” to deepen the knowledge of experienced EM teachers; and leadership training for administrators, mentors, and coaches, designed to enhance their understanding of EM and ensure a successful implementation of the program. Other sessions will explore differentiation opportunities, assessment, classroom management and the Common Core State Standards. Conference participants are invited to a panel discussion with EM authors on July 31. For registration and detailed information, visit McGraw Hill Education’s National Users’ Conference website.

Everyday Mathematics Summer Professional Development Workshops

  • Jul 16, 2012, 8:00am-2:30pm CST

CEMSE (Center for Elementary Mathematics and Science Education)
University of Chicago
Mott Building
1225 East 60th Street, Chicago, IL 60637

Register here

Everyday Mathematics New-User Workshops

These sessions are intended for teachers who are either:

  • new to Everyday Mathematics or
  • teaching a new grade level of the curriculum.

The sessions will include a discussion of basic implementation strategies for Everyday Mathematics. A common thread throughout will be discussion of the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics (CCSS-M), including the Standards for Mathematical Practice.

Select from the folowing New User Sessions:
July 23: Everyday Mathematics Grade 1
July 23: Everyday Mathematics Grade 2
July 24: Everyday Mathematics Grade 3
July 24: Everyday Mathematics Grade 5
July 25: Everyday Mathematics Grade 4
July 25: Everyday Mathematics Kindergarten
July 16: Everyday Mathematics Special Ed.

Register here

Everyday Mathematics Experienced-User Workshops

These sessions are intended for experienced users who are interested in receiving a more in-depth look at the mathematics and pedagogy of Everyday Mathematics. A common thread throughout will be discussion of the CCSS-M and the Standards for Mathematical Practice.
Teachers will work in grade level bands of K–2 or 3–5.

Select from the following Experienced-User Sessions:
July 16: Everyday Mathematics Grades K–2
July 17: Everyday Mathematics Grades 3–5

WHERE:
CEMSE (Center for Elementary Mathematics and Science Education) University of Chicago
Mott Building
1225 East 60th Street, Chicago, IL 60637
Free street parking is available on 60th Street or on the Midway Plaisance. If no street parking is available, please come to the lobby of 1225 E. 60th St. to receive a parking pass to a nearby lot.

TIME:
Breakfast - 8:00 a.m. – 8:30 a.m.
Workshop - 8:30 a.m. – 2:30 p.m.
Lunch will also be provided .

What to bring: Participants teaching grades 1st - 5th should bring the Teacher's Lesson Guide, Volume 1, the Assessment Handbook, and the Differentiation Handbook. Kindergarten participants should bring the Teachers' Guide to Activities and the Assessment Handbook.

Cost: $100.00. The price includes a light breakfast and lunch.
All session are limited to 35 participants. A minimum of 15 participants is needed for each session or the session will be canceled. If a session is canceled you will receive a full refund. CPDUs will be awarded upon completion. Credit Card payment is the only payment option. We are unable to accept POs or checks.

Questions about the workshop please contact:
Denise Porter, Co-Director of School Support Services,
porterd@uchicago.edu,
773-834-0060 (Office)

Questions about registration: cstemec@gmail.com

Everyday Mathematics New-User Workshops

  • Apr 21, 2012, 8:30am-2:00pm CST

Donoghue Charter School
707 E. 37th Street, Chicago, IL 60653

Everyday Mathematics New User Training for Grades K-5 and Special Education

Grades K-5 Day 4: This is the fourth day in a series of 4, one-day sessions for new users of Everyday Mathematics with an embundle phasis on components, routines, management tips, manipulative use, classroom organization, games, assessment, differentiation, pedagogy and math content within the context of upcoming units. We will also be discussing goal setting for the next school year.

Grades K-5 Day 3 Special Education Focus Session: This is day three in a series of three. This session will be focused on providing K-5 special education teachers with strategies to differentiate instruction, management tips, classroom organization, games, and assessment.

Parking is available in the school parking lot (approximately 60 spots) along with additional street parking.

A light breakfast will be served from 8:00am-8:30am. The workshop begins promptly at 8:30am. Participants should bring Teacher's Lesson Guide Volume 2, the Assessment Handbook, and the Differentiation Handbook.

*Kindergarten participants should bring the Teacher's Guide to Activities, Resources for the Kindergarten Classroom, Center Activity Cards and Assessment Handbook.

Cost: $100.00

The price includes a light breakfast and lunch. All grade level sessions are limited to 35 participants. A minimum of 15 participants is needed for each grade level session or session will be canceled. In the event of a session being canceled you will receive a full refund. CPDUs will be awarded upon completion. Credit card payments are the only payment option at this time. We are unable to receive POs or checks.

Please register here

Questions about the workshop please contact: Denise Porter, porterd@uchicago.edu, 773-834-0060 (Office)

Questions about registration or problems with code, email us at: cemsepdreg@gmail.com

CEMSE SeminarEvaluation for Learning and Accountability

  • Apr 6, 2012, 12:30-2:00pm CST

Center for Elementary Mathematics and Science Education (CEMSE)
1225 E. 60th Street (Mott Building), Room 326

Katherine Ryan
Associate Professor, Quantitative and Evaluative Research Methodologies, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

The goal of all educational evaluation is to enable programs and policies to improve student learning. At the same time, notions of educational accountability, control, and improvement are often entangled with evaluation (Nevo, 2002; Ryan, 2005). This presentation reports findings from a three year mixed-methods (survey questionnaire and focus groups) evaluation examining state-level NCLB educational accountability consequences from teacher and principal perspectives. In addition to corroborating well-known unintended consequences (e.g., increased test preparation), other findings are presented. These include, for example, that teachers' understanding of and experiences with “good teaching” and “quality learning” within the top-down accountability policy context are mediated by local organizational and relational opportunities and constraints. Based on these findings and other research, I propose an extended educational accountability model that incorporates school-based evaluation may be able to better support instructional practices and school improvement efforts.

Research Biography

Katherine Ryan’s research interests focus on educational evaluation and the intersection of educational accountability issues and high stakes assessment. As educational accountability has become increasingly more important nationally and globally, her work has examined both evaluative capacity building and monitoring issues involved in test-based educational accountability. Her current research includes an investigation of the intended and unintended consequences of a state-wide assessment and accountability system in relationship to students, instruction, and educational outcomes.

STEM Schools Webinar SeriesWebinar 5: School Partnerships – K–12 Schools as Partners

  • Mar 6, 2012, 3:00 - 4:00pm CST

Free and open to the public
Register for this webinar

The concluding webinar in our series will focus on partnerships among K12 schools to support STEM teaching and learning. Our presenter is Michelle Kolar, Executive Director for Professional Field Services at the Illinois Math and Science Academy.

Participants will have an opportunity to interact with each other and with the webinar presenter. The series has highlighted different models for establishing, implementing, and sustaining partnerships, with presenters discussing the biggest challenges and greatest rewards, as well as their measures of success. To view archived webinars from this series, visit the Researchers Without Borders website.

Presenter

Michelle Kolar, Executive Director for Professional Field Services, Illinois Math and Science Academy (IMSA), Aurora, IL

STEM Schools Webinar SeriesWebinar 4: School Partnerships – K–12 Schools and Institutions of Higher Education

  • Feb 21, 2012, 3:00 - 4:00pm CST

Free and open to the public
Register for this webinar

This Schools and Partnerships session will focus on partnerships between K–12 schools and higher education institutions in the Charlotte Mecklenburg School, NC, district as described by Cindy Moss, the district's Director of Math and Science. Charlotte Mecklenburg Schools is one of the 25th largest school districts in the US, serving some 140,000 students. Their STEM initiatives are part of a broad spectrum of learning experiences provided for students and teachers in the Pre-K12 programs.

Presenter

Cindy Moss, Director of Science and Math, Charlotte Mecklenburg Schools, Charlotte, NC

STEM Schools Webinar SeriesWebinar 3: School Partnerships – K-12 Schools and Community Organizations

  • Feb 7, 2012, 3:00 - 4:30pm CST

Webinar 3 highlights partnerships between K-12 schools and community organizations by focusing on Hughes STEM High School and its partnership with the Cincinnati Museum Center. The Hughes STEM High School offers a bold new approach to education in Cincinnati Public Schools. It embraces the view that academic content should not be taught in isolation. Students are immersed in rich, meaningful, STEM experiences through interdisciplinary coursework applied in the context of the real world through business and community partnerships. In these workplace experiences, students not only learn to apply knowledge, but they also learn about a wide range of STEM careers, develop professional communication skills, and develop their ability to apply technology to real world situations. In short, Hughes STEM High School leads students to develop the skills that they will need in order to succeed in the 21st century.

The Cincinnati Museum Center supports the school's mission by "doing whatever it takes!" Its large and inviting building has unusual spaces particularly suited to exploration and experimentation; it also makes available an on-site DNA processing lab and an on-site paleontology prep laboratory. A number of classes and school events are held at the Center. They have 3 staff scientists and an archeologist available to assist and engage the students. The Museum Center staff believes that STEM is broad enough to excite and engage every type of student in some way because STEM has become such a fundamental part of each of our lives - and so they see that STEM is a key, opportunistic educational tool.

Presenters:

Kathy Wright, Program Facilitator, Hughes STEM High School, Cincinnati, OH

Tonya Matthews, Vice President of Museums, Cincinnati Museum Center, Cincinnati, OH

STEM Schools Webinar SeriesWebinar 2: School Partnerships – K-12 Schools and STEM Industry and Business

  • Jan 24, 2012, 3:00 - 4:30pm CST

Register for this webinar

This on-going webinar series focuses on a range of partnerships that support K-12 STEM teaching and learning. Participants will have an opportunity to interact with webinar presenters from K-12 schools, industry, community organizations, and higher education. The series will highlight different models for establishing, implementing, and sustaining partnerships through March 6, 2012.

This webinar focuses on partnerships between K-12 schools and STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) industry and business at the A.J. Wittenberg Elementary School of Engineering (www.greenville.k12.sc.us/ajw/), in South Carolina, and the Center for Research in Engineering, Science and Technology (CREST) at Paradise Valley High School (http://www.pvschools.net/crest/generalOvrvw.html), in Arizona. The A.J. Whittenberg Elementary School of Engineering is the most technologically advanced elementary school in Greenville County. The school is named for A.J. Whittenberg, a pioneer for civil rights who is best known for his stand on the integration of Greenville County Schools.

The Center for Research in Engineering, Science and Technology (CREST) is a four year program of studies focusing on the practical application of knowledge and work place competency skills in three areas of scientific research; Engineering, Biotechnology and Sustainability. The school is located on the campus of Paradise Valley HighSchool in Phoenix, Arizona. High school students from the Paradise Valley Unified School District, as well as across the north valley of Maricopa County, enroll to participate in a focused curriculum of study accompanied by a complete array of honors-AP courses, college, and dual enrollment classes, electives, and traditional school activities. This unique school, housed in a newly constructed (2010) green building, was initiated with funding from a City of Phoenix block grant to support small learning communities focusing on STEM initiatives. The goals of the school are supported by several university and business partnerships that will enhance the curriculum and provide relevant learning opportunities for students.

Presenters:

Ansel Sanders, Program Director, A.J. Wittenberg Elementary School of Engineering, Greenville, SC

Linda Coyle, Center for Research in Engineering, Science and Technology (CREST)/CTE STEM Curriculum Specialist,Paradise Valley High School, Phoenix, AZ

Alison Smith, Community Outreach Coordinator for Educational Services at Salt River Project (SRP), Phoenix, AZ

CEMSE WebinarUsing Everyday Mathematics to Support Implementation of the Common Core State Standards

  • Jan 11, 2012, 4:00pm CST

Watch the archived webinar on the Virtual Learning Community (VLC). This requires registration in the VLC.

The Center for Elementary Mathematics and Science Education is holding a webinar on using Everyday Mathematics to support the Common Core State Standards. This webinar will be held this Wednesday, January 11th, at 4 p.m. CST.

This webinar is the first of hopefully many webinars sponsored by the Everyday Mathematics Virtual Learning Community (vlc.uchicago.edu). Participants are welcome to continue the discussion in the EM Discussion Group on the Virtual Learning Community.

STEM Schools Webinar SeriesSchool Partnerships: An Introduction

  • Jan 10, 2012, 3:00pm-4:30pm CST

The first webinar in this series will provide an overview of the varied ways that schools enhance K-12 STEM teaching and learning through partnerships with entities like STEM industry and business, community organizations, and higher education. To begin the webinar series conversation, Laurie McFarlin of the Dayton Regional STEM School (www.daytonstemschool.org) will talk about the establishment, maintenance, and sustainability of the school's regional partnerships in education, business and industry, and community and government, where partners are viewed as their "connection to the real world." This first webinar will build a base for the following webinars and provide a chance for participants to articulate their questions for the coming sessions. For more information on the series, see the RWB website at http://www.researcherswithoutborders.org/events.

Presenters:

Laurie McFarlin, Director, Communications and Partnerships | WSU/OSLN STEM Network Liaison, Dayton Regional STEM School, Kettering, OH

Tom Furey, President, Standard Register Industrial, Dayton, OH

CEMSE Seminar: Ohio STEM Learning Network Study: Measuring Implementation, Spread, and Sustainability of STEM Innovations

  • Nov 16, 2011, 12:00pm-1:00pm

Center for Elementary Mathematics and Science Education (CEMSE)
1225 E. 60th Street, Room 304

Dr. Jeanne Century will report on a National Science Foundation funded study of the Ohio STEM Learning Network (OSLN). This study is examining the implementation, spread and sustainability of five STEM "Platform" high schools in Ohio (Columbus, Cincinnati, Cleveland, Dayton, and Akron), their partnerships with business and higher education (referred to as "hubs") and the organization of hubs into the OSLN.

The presentation will include an overview of the project and how it builds on previous work examining the measurement of implementation of innovations and the factors that affect implementation, spread, and sustainability of innovations. We will describe the "critical components" of STEM schools that the research group has identified, the factors affecting implementation of the STEM school models, and findings from the first round of data collection.

The presentation will include information about the outgrowths of this project including an ongoing webinar series on STEM schools and new work connecting to STEM networks in other states.

Presenter: Jeanne Century is the Director of Science Education and Research Evaluation at the University of Chicago's Center for Elementary Mathematics and Science Education (CEMSE). Century has spent the majority of her 20-year career working in, and with urban schools and large urban school districts across the country. She has developed comprehensive science instructional materials for the elementary and middle school levels and been part of professional development, technical assistance and strategic planning efforts for teachers and school and district administrators across the country. Her research and evaluation efforts have focused on the impact of inquiry science instruction, strategies for improving utilization of research and evaluation, sustainability of reform efforts, and measurement of fidelity and enactment of interventions and innovations. Century served on the Education Policy and Department of Education Agency Review transition teams for the Obama-Biden administration where she focused on STEM education and education research and development and recently shared the National Association for Research in Science Teaching award for the most significant publication of 2010.

Everyday Mathematics New-User Workshop Trainings Day 2

  • Nov 5, 2011, 8:30am-2:00pm

Donoghue Charter School
707 E. 37th Street, Chicago, IL 60653

CEMSE (Center for Elementary Math and Science Education) will be offering Everyday Mathematics New-User workshops on Saturday, November 5, 2011.

Grades K-5 Day 2: This is the second day in a series of 4, one-day sessions for new users of Everyday Mathematics with an emphasis on components, routines, management tips, manipulative use, classroom organization, games, assessment, differentiation, pedagogy and math content within the context of upcoming units. We will also be discussing preparing students for ISAT, Common Core State Standards, as well as Everyday Mathematics technology resources.

Grades K-5 Day 1 Special Education Focus Session: This is a one-day session in a series of three focused on providing K-5 special education teachers with strategies to differentiate instruction, management tips, classroom organization, games, and assessment

WHAT: Everyday Mathematics New User Training for Grades K-5 and Special Education

DATE: November 5, 2011

TIME: 8:30am-2:00pm

WHERE: Donoghue Charter School
707 E. 37th Street, Chicago, IL 60653

Parking is available in the school parking lot (Approximately 60 spots) along with additional street parking.

A light breakfast will be served from 8:00am-8:30am. The workshop begins promptly at 8:30am. Participants should bring Teacher's Lesson Guide Volume 1, the Assessment Handbook, and the Differentiation Handbook. *Kindergarten participants should bring the Teachers' Guide to Activities, Resources for the Kindergarten Classroom, Center Activity Cards and Assessment Handbook.

Cost: $100.00

The price includes a light breakfast and lunch. All grade level sessions are limited to 35 participants. A minimum of 15 participants is needed for each grade level session or session will be canceled. In the event of a session being canceled you will receive a full refund. CPDUs will be awarded upon completion. Credit Card payments are the only payment option at this time. We are unable to receive POs or checks.

To register please visit us at - http://novempd2.eventbrite.com/

Questions regarding the workshops contact:

Amanda Zimolzak
CEMSE
School Support Services
azimolzak@uchicago.edu
773-834-8892 Office
773-577-3870 Cell

Questions about registration: cemsepdreg@gmail.com

STEM School WebinarsWebinar 3: Math, Engineering, Technology and Science Academy (METSA), Carrollton, TX the New Tech Network

  • Nov 1, 2011, 3:00pm-4:00pm

Free and open to the public
Register for this webinar

About the Series

Many conversations in education today are focused on "STEM" schools. However these conversations are taking place among individuals and organizations that have little shared understanding of what exactly STEM schools are. This webinar series will provide participants with an opportunity to learn about a range of STEM schools across the country and to share information and engage with one another. The webinars will have an interactive format so that participants can learn about STEM schools directly from school leaders while also sharing experiences and ideas, raising questions, and beginning conversations about similarities and differences across STEM schools. The series will be relevant to anyone interested in STEM education today. Visit http://researcherswithoutborders.org/media for more information and to register.

About Webinar 3

This is the third in CEMSE's Researchers Without Borders fall webinar series, What is a STEM school?. This session provides an in-depth look at Math, Engineering, Technology and Science Academy (METSA) in Carrollton, TX and the New Tech Network.

METSA is for students interested in the field of Engineering or Engineering Technology. The Academy is housed at R. L. Turner High School, a comprehensive grade 9-12 high school located in Carrollton and one of four high schools in the Carrollton-Farmers Branch Independent School District. The program offers college preparatory mathematics and science courses, introduces students to the discipline of engineering and engineering technology, with the appropriate scope and rigor prior to entering college. The coursework is delivered in a project- or problem-based approach that allows students to investigate and experience practical problem-solving.

METSA creates personalized learning environments where all students are given individual attention and challenged to meet high expectations. METSA is an open enrollment, T-STEM (Texas-Science Technology, Engineering and Math), Title I public school-within-a-school model, which opened its doors in August 2007 to 86 incoming freshman.

Presenters:

  • Mansoureh Tehrani, Director of Math, Engineering, Technology and Science Academy (METSA) *A New Tech Network school, Carrollton, TX
  • Kevin Gant, New Tech Network coach

For more information on the series, go to http://researcherswithoutborders.org/media

Past Webinars

Webinar 2: What is a STEM School? Metro Early College High School, Columbus, OH

Learn more about this webinar.

Webinar 1: What is a STEM School? Introduction

Learn more about this webinar.

STEM School WebinarsWebinar 2: What is a STEM School? Metro Early College High School, Columbus, OH

  • Oct 18, 2011, 3:00pm-4:30pm

Free and open to the public

About the Series

Many conversations in education today are focused on "STEM" schools. However these conversations are taking place among individuals and organizations that have little shared understanding of what exactly STEM schools are. This webinar series will provide participants with an opportunity to learn about a range of STEM schools across the country and to share information and engage with one another. The webinars will have an interactive format so that participants can learn about STEM schools directly from school leaders while also sharing experiences and ideas, raising questions, and beginning conversations about similarities and differences across STEM schools. The series will be relevant to anyone interested in STEM education today. Visit http://researcherswithoutborders.org/media for more information and to register.

About Webinar 2

This session will provide an in-depth look at Metro Early College High School in Columbus, Ohio and Reynoldsburg STEM Academy in Reynoldsburg, Ohio. Established in 2006, Metro Early College High School was born out of the desire of both the Ohio State University and Battelle to create a "small" STEM (science, technology, engineering, mathematics) school with a "big footprint." Made possible through the facilitation and network the Educational Council, Metro is a demonstration site for The Ohio STEM Learning Network (OSLN), and was the first higher education (The Ohio State University), business (Battelle Memorial Institute), and K-12 partnership for STEM learning in Ohio. As a demonstration site and center for innovation, it is our responsibility to improve educational systems through teaching for the 21st Century and then rapidly prototype for sharing across educational systems working in this endeavor for the future of our collective students.

Presenters:

  • Marcy Raymond, Principal, Reynoldsburg STEM Academy, Reynoldsburg, OH, former Principal, Metro Early College High School, Columbus, OH
  • Aimee Kennedy, Principal, Metro Early College High School, Columbus, OH

Past Webinars

Webinar 1: What is a STEM School? Introduction

Learn more about this webinar.

STEM School WebinarsWebinar 1: What is a STEM School? Introduction

  • Oct 3, 2011, 3:00pm-4:30pm

Many conversations in education today are focused on "STEM" schools. However these conversations are taking place among individuals and organizations that have little shared understanding of what exactly STEM schools are. This webinar series will provide participants with an opportunity to learn about a range of STEM schools across the country and to share information and engage with one another. The webinars will have an interactive format so that participants can learn about STEM schools directly from school leaders while also sharing experiences and ideas, raising questions, and beginning conversations about similarities and differences across STEM schools. The series will be relevant to anyone interested in STEM education today. Visit http://researcherswithoutborders.org/media for more information and to register.

Monday, October 3, 2011 3 pm to 4:30 pm (CDT)

View this archived webinar on Researchers Without Borders

CEMSE Seminar: Re-thinking Teacher Evaluation

  • Oct 28, 2011, 12:00pm-1:00pm

1225 E 60th Street, Room 304, Chicago, IL 60637

Re-thinking Teacher Evaluation: Findings from A Study of Chicago's Excellence in Teaching Pilot

Friday October 28, 12 noon to 1 pm
1225 E 60th Street
Room 304
Chicago, IL 60637
Free and open to the public

Dr. Sara Ray Stoelinga, Senior Director of the Urban Education Institute, will summarize findings from a two-year study of Chicago's Excellence in Teaching Pilot, an ambitious effort to improve how teachers are evaluated and receive feedback on their performance. This effort was at the forefront of a national movement to revitalize teacher evaluation motivated by the lack of meaningful feedback that teachers receive on their instruction and the failure of traditional teacher evaluation to differentiate among high- and low-performing teachers. The study examines the reliability and validity of Charlotte Danielson's Framework for Teaching, the extent of teacher and principal buy-in, and the depth of institutionalization of the new evaluation process into schools. Findings reveal some positive indications of the reliability and validity of the Danielson Framework, and positive perceptions of teachers and principals. At the same time, however, the study reveals variations in severity of principal ratings and the need for deepened conversations between teachers and principals to enable instructional improvement.

Sara Ray Stoelinga is Senior Director at the Urban Education Institute (UEI), as well as an associate clinical professor on the Committee on Education. Stoelinga leads research projects focused on teacher quality, teaches within the University of Chicago Urban Teacher Education Program, and teaches and advises undergraduate and graduate students at the University of Chicago. Stoelinga supports evaluation research across UEI and engages in local and national engagement.

Stoelinga has written extensively on teacher and principal leadership, as well as teacher effectiveness including two books: Effective Teacher Leadership: Using Research to Inform and Reform (2008) and Examining Effective Teacher Leadership: A Case Study Approach (with Melinda M. Mangin, 2010). Stoelinga received her B.A. and Ph.D. in sociology from the University of Chicago. Her areas of expertise include leadership, teacher evaluation, school reform policy and history, and organizational change in schools.

CEMSE EM SeminarsAugust 26: EM CCSS Edition Technology, Part 2

  • Aug 26, 2011, 12:30pm

1225 E 60th Street, Room 304, Chicago, IL 60637

Friday, August 26, 2011 at 12:30 pm

Where: Center for Elementary Math Science Education
Room 304, 1225 E 60th Street, Chicago, IL

Everyday Mathematics Common Core State Standards Edition Technology, Part 2

Members of the McGraw-Hill editorial staff will present information on the enhanced electronic and online features of the Everyday Mathematics Common Core State Standards (EM CCSS) edition. The presentation will focus on three areas of the EM CCSS edition: the new c2012 eSuite teacher portal; the ePresentations and eToolkit; and the c2012 eSuite student portal and parent support.

The McGraw-Hill presenters include Mary Carol Ghislin, senior editor; Jessica Egloff, editor; Erica Sebastian, associate editor; Melissa Wisniewski, assistant editor; and Mary Cooney, editorial director.

CEMSE EM SeminarsAug 17: EM CCSS Edition TechnologyAug 19: What will it look like in the classroom, and how will students be assessed?

  • Aug 17, 2011, 12:30pm
  • Aug 19, 2011, 12:30pm

1225 E 60th Street, Room 304, Chicago, IL 60637

Wednesday, August 17, 2011 at 12:30 pm

Where: Center for Elementary Math Science Education
Room 304, 1225 E 60th Street, Chicago, IL

August 17 – McGraw-Hill Education Technology

Everyday Mathematics Common Core State Standards Edition Technology, Part 1

Three senior members of the McGraw-Hill editorial staff will introduce some of the on-line and electronic components of the Everyday Mathematics Common Core State Standards (EM CCSS) edition. The presentation will include both demonstrations and discussion focused on three areas of the edition’s technology: the new features and functionality of the iTLG (interactive Teacher’s Lesson Guide); the ExamView CD software for EMCCSS; and the online Crosswalk for Everyday Mathematics c2007 users.

Everyday Mathematics Common Core State Standards Edition Technology, Part 2 will be presented on Friday, August 26. It will focus on three additional areas of the EM CCSS edition: the new c2012 eSuite teacher portal; the ePresentations and the eToolkit; and the c2012 eSuite student portal and parent support.

The presenters from McGraw-Hill Education are Luke Zajac, executive editor; Linda Benesch, senior editor; and Joan Green, editorial director.

Friday, August 19, 12:30 p.m. – David Foster

Common Core State Standards in Mathematics – What will it look like in the classroom, and how will students be assessed?

How will the new Common Core State Standards (CCSS) affect the teaching and learning of mathematics? How might the CCSS influence summative and formative assessments? How are the standards being addressed and embraced, and what innovations are occurring in other states? How will curriculum change? What are some examples of curriculum and assessments for the CCSS? How will teaching and learning change? This session will address these questions and share work and products from several states that are embracing the new core standards.

David Foster is the executive director of the Silicon Valley Mathematics Initiative (SVMI), comprised of 45 member districts in the greater San Francisco Bay Area. Besides the intensive work in California, SVMI consults in states across the country, including New York, Illinois, Massachusetts, Ohio, Tennessee and Georgia. SVMI is affiliated with programs at University of California, Berkeley, Stanford University and San Jose State University. David established SVMI in 1996 while working as Mathematics Director for the Robert N. Noyce Foundation. Foster is the primary author of Interactive Mathematics: Activities and Investigations, published by Glencoe/McGraw-Hill in 1994. David was a Regional Director for the Middle Grade Mathematics Renaissance of the California State Systemic Initiative. David taught mathematics and computer science at middle school, high school, and community college levels for 18 years. He also works part-time for San Jose State University. He is co-director of the Santa Clara Valley Math Project. He is also co-chair of the advisory committee of the Mathematics Assessment Resource Service/Balanced Assessment. He is a consultant to the Urban Math Leadership Network that works with the 25 largest school districts in America.

CEMSE EM SeminarsAug 10: Analyzing the Demands on and Supports for Teachers in Elementary Mathematics Curricula

  • Aug 10, 2011, 12:30pm

1225 E 60th Street, Room 304, Chicago, IL 60637

Wednesday, August 10, 2011 at 12:30 pm

Center for Elementary Math Science Education
Room 304, 1225 E 60th Street, Chicago, IL
(There will not be a seminar on August 12)

In this talk, Dr. Stein will argue that curricula differ with respect to the demands placed on teacher learning and the supports provided to teachers. Thus, curriculum selection decisions should be informed by a consideration of how each curriculum's demands and supports map onto the competence of a district's teaching force and the kinds of professional development that district leaders are prepared to provide. She will begin by reviewing the concept of cognitive demand and applying it to the student materials of two standards-based elementary mathematics curricula: Everyday Mathematics and Investigations. The implications of differing levels of cognitive demand on students are traced--both conceptually and empirically--to demands on teachers. This is followed by an analysis of supports for teacher learning in Everyday Mathematics and Investigations and the extent to which teachers' use of those supports is related to the quality of their implementation.

Mary Kay Stein holds a joint appointment at the University of Pittsburgh as Professor of Learning Sciences and Policy and Senior Scientist at the Learning Research and Development Center. Her early research focused on classroom-based teaching and learning with the aim of understanding the nature of effective instructional practices in mathematics. In the 1990s Dr. Stein's research interests expanded to include the school and district contexts of teacher learning and professional development. Most notably, she studied the connections between district policy and classroom practice in New York City's Community School District 2 as well as district-wide instructional reforms in the San Diego City Schools resulting in a number of widely read articles (e.g., "Inquiry at the Crossroads of Policy and Learning" in Teachers College Record) and a book (Reform as Learning: School Reform, Organizational Culture, and Community Politics in San Diego). She has just completed an investigation of how the teacher learning demands of different curricula (Everyday Mathematics vs. Investigations) influences teacher learning in large-scale reforms in two urban districts.

Dr. Stein has served as the Education Chairperson on the Riverview School Board for the past 10 years. Over the past several years, she has been a principal or co-principal investigator of a number of grants from both public (National Science Foundation, Institute for Education Sciences) and private (Spencer, MacArthur) foundations. Dr. Stein has served on several national panels including the National Academy of Education's Panel on Strengthening the Capacity of Research to Impact Policy and Practice and NCTM's Standards Impact Research Group. Recently, she chaired the Committee on Large Scale Reform in K-12 Education" for the National Research Council. Mary Kay is the Founding Director of the Learning Policy Center at the University of Pittsburgh (founded in 2006). In 2008, she was named the Associate Director of the Learning Research and Development Center.

CEMSE EM SeminarsAug 3: How do math curricula communicate with teachers?Aug 5: Common Core Standards treatment of measurement

  • Aug 3, 2011, 12:30pm
  • Aug 5, 2011, 12:30pm

1225 E 60th Street, Room 304, Chicago, IL 60637

Wednesday, August 3, 2011 at 12:30 pm

Where: Center for Elementary Math Science Education
Room 304
1225 E 60th Street, Chicago, IL

Modes of Address: How and what do mathematics curriculum materials communicate to teachers?

Dr. Janine Remillard will present findings from a comparative analysis of teacher's guides from five different curriculum programs for elementary mathematics. The specific focus of the analysis is how curriculum authors communicate with teachers and the types of guidance they provide. Variations in how the curriculum materials communicate with teachers reveal different assumptions about what teachers know and need to know in order to use them, what teaching involves, and what the teacher's role is. Understanding these implicit messages lays the groundwork for examining how teachers read and engage with these resources and is critical to studying the means by which curriculum materials can be educative for teachers.

Dr. Janine Remillard is an associate professor of mathematics education and chair of the Teaching, Learning, and Leadership Division of the Graduate School of Education at the University of Pennsylvania. Her research interests include mathematics teaching, urban education, teachers' interactions with and use of mathematics curriculum materials, and curriculum design. Currently, Dr. Remillard is P.I. of an NSF-funded study called Improving Curriculum Use for Better Teaching. She is a co-editor of the volume, Mathematics Teachers at Work: Connecting Curriculum Materials and Classroom Instruction.

Wednesday, August 3, 2011 at 12:30 pm

The treatment of measurement in the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics: Suggestions for authors of elementary mathematics curricula

An analysis of the development of grade-by-grade standards in the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics (CCSS-M) for teaching and learning measurement will be presented, with emphasis given to spatial measurement (length, area, and volume). Differences between the content of current elementary curricula (including Everyday Mathematics) and the CCSS-M's treatment of spatial measurement will be outlined. Particular attention will be given to conceptual content that seems necessary for students to develop richer understandings but that is not explicitly mandated in the CCSS-M.

John P. (Jack) Smith III studies human learning and development (and the nature of ambitious teaching), particularly in the domain of mathematics. He is currently Associate Professor in the Department of Counseling, Educational Psychology, and Special Education, in the College of Education at Michigan State University. His recent research has concerned middle school and high school students' reactions to and transitions between "reform" and "traditional" curriculum; the development of students' algebraic thinking; the structure and content of states' K-8 mathematics standards in geometry and measurement; and the contributions of written curricula to the challenge of teaching and learning spatial measurement (length, area, and volume). He currently directs the Strengthening Tomorrow's Education in Measurement (STEM) project based at MSU. He holds Bachelor's degrees in mathematics and philosophy and Master's and Ph.D. degrees from the Graduate School of Education, at UC Berkeley. He is currently the Director of the Educational Psychology and Educational Technology doctoral program and a member of Mathematics Education Faculty Group at MSU.

CEMSE EM SeminarsJuly 27: Trajectories and Spatial AbilityJuly 29: Mathematical Understanding

  • Jul 27, 2011, 12:30pm
  • Jul 29, 2011, 12:30pm

1225 E 60th Street, Room 304, Chicago, IL 60637

Wednesday, July 27, 2011 at 12:30 pm

Where: Center for Elementary Math Science Education
Room 304
1225 E 60th Street, Chicago, IL

Learning Trajectories in Everyday Mathematics Strands

Everyday Mathematics Strands Working Group – Several working groups made up of CEMSE employees and consultants are currently planning revisions and developments of the Everyday Mathematics curriculum. In this seminar, the strands working group will share the strands that they have chosen to study in this planning phase. They will describe the process that they developed for outlining the learning trajectories that exist in the research related to each strand, as well as the way that the group is tracing strand growth and development within Everyday Mathematics. The group will share samples of the research traces and EM traces that have been started. They will solicit feedback on the identified strands as well as the process that they outline.

Friday, July 29, 2011 at 12:30 pm

Relation of Spatial Ability to Young Children's Numerical Understanding

Raedy Ping – As a part of their ongoing collaboration with CEMSE, Raedy Ping, a researcher at the Spatial Intelligence and Learning Center (SILC), an NSF Science of Learning Center, will be discussing work on how spatial ability is related to number line understanding and how spatial representations can help young children's numerical understanding. In particular, this seminar will focus on surveying some research about the relationship between A) space and number, and B) space and math operations in the young learner. Raedy will also review research about how spatial tools can help learners understand math operations, such as addition, by helping improve their understanding of what the equals sign means. The group will look at how these topics are currently covered in Everyday Math's Pre-K through 2nd grade resources and discuss some basic suggestions for how space and spatial tools could be utilized in lessons about number and math operations. Raedy Ping is a post-doctoral researcher at SILC, based in part at the University of Chicago's Department of Psychology, working with Drs. Susan Levine and Susan Goldin-Meadow. Her research focuses on the role of the body in space during learning, with topics ranging from how preschoolers learn about geometry to how adults learn about organic chemistry. She is also interested in how we can best translate empirical findings from the lab into classroom practice. Raedy received her PhD in Developmental Psychology from the University of Chicago in 2009. She has also worked at the Learning Sciences Research Institute at University of Illinois-Chicago, where she studied how students interact with GIS software and the use of interactive computer simulations in science learning.

CEMSE EM SeminarsJuly 20: Examine Teachers' Virtual Learning CommunityJuly 22: The Structure of Math Problems

  • Jul 20, 2011, 12:30pm
  • Jul 22, 2011, 12:30

1225 E 60th Street, Room 304, Chicago, IL 60637

Wednesday, July 20, 2011 at 12:30 pm

Where: Center for Elementary Math Science Education
Room 304
1225 E 60th Street, Chicago, IL

Virtual Learning Community Team: Development of a Virtual Learning Community for Elementary Teachers

A team of developers at the Center for Elementary Mathematics and Science Education has recently launched an alpha version of an online community for elementary teachers (see http://vlc.uchicago.edu). This community, funded by both the National Science Foundation and the Illinois Board of Higher Education, provides a space for teachers to access and discuss resources related to mathematics teaching, including video clips of elementary teaching and instructional resources related to the Everyday Mathematics curriculum. In this seminar, the development team will show the audience the key features of the virtual community, including both the public portions of the site and the private database of video and resources used by the team to make decisions about site content. The team will also discuss the current state of the project, including the website’s membership and usage trends, the history of the site’s development, and the future directions for the site.

Virtual Learning Community Team: David Beer, Meg Bates, Cheryl Moran, Debbie Leslie, Mollie Rudnick, Mikhail Guzowski, Darlene Ulrich, Diana Barrie, Margaret Sharkey, Jarrett Colby, and Rick Robertson make up the Virtual Learning Community team at CEMSE.

Friday, July 22, 2011

David Spangler: Problem Structures and the Four Operations

To help decide which operation to use to solve a problem, students can draw diagrams to represent the relationship between the action in the problem and the objects involved. The diagrams help students visualize the various types of problems that can be solved with a given operation. In this seminar, we will examine the various problem structures for each operation -- and possible visualizations for each. The seminar cites research, the Common Core State Standards, examples from Everyday Mathematics, and personal views from the presenter. The problem-solving strand in EM is strong in the previous editions. A goal of the talk is to encourage curriculum planners, writers, and editors to consider further strengthening this strand by including more instruction about problem solving and ensuring that the various problem structures for each operation are adequately represented.

David Spangler is a Senior Editor for the Everyday Mathematics program at CEMSE.

Everyday Mathematics New-User Workshops

  • Aug 9, 2011, 8:00am
  • Aug 10, 2011, 8:00am
  • Aug 11, 2011, 8:00am

1225 E 60th Street, Chicago, IL 60637

CEMSE, the institutional home of the Everyday Mathematics author group, is offering Everyday Mathematics New-User Workshops on August 8, 9, and 11.

These one-day sessions are for new users of Everyday Mathematics, with an emphasis on components, routines, management tips, manipulative use, classroom organization, games, assessment, differentiation, pedagogy, and math content.

AUGUST 8: Everyday Mathematics GRADES 1 2 Sessions
AUGUST 9: Everyday Mathematics GRADES 3 4 Sessions
AUGUST 11: Everyday Mathematics GRADES KDG 5 Sessions

WHERE: CEMSE (Center for Elementary Math and Science Education)
University of Chicago, Mott Building,
1225 East 60th Street
Chicago, IL 60637

A light breakfast will be served at each session from 8:00-8:30 am. The workshop begins promptly at 8:30 am. Participants for Grades 1 through 5 should bring Teacher's Lesson Guide Volume 1, the Assessment Handbook, and the Differentiation Handbook. Kindergarten participants should bring the Teachers' Guide to Activities and Assessment Handbook.

Cost: $100.00 . The price includes a light breakfast and lunch. All session are limited to 35 participants. A minimum of 15 participants is needed for each session or session will be canceled. In the event of a session being canceled you will receive a full refund. CPDUs will be awarded upon completion. Credit Card payments are the only payment option at this time. We are unable to receive POs or checks.

Click here to register!!

Questions regarding the workshops contact: Denise Porter
CEMSE Director, School Support Services
porterd@uchicago.edu
Office: 773-834-0060
Cell: 630-297-5521
Questions about registration: cemsepdreg@gmail.com

CEMSE EM Seminars Continue

  • Jul 13, 2011, 12:30pm
  • Jul 15, 2011, 12:30pm

1225 E 60th Street, Room 304, Chicago, IL 60637

Wednesday, July 13, 2011 at 12:30 pm

Where: Center for Elementary Math Science Education
Room 304
1225 E 60th Street, Chicago, IL

Assessment Working Group: Current State of Work

Several working groups made up of CEMSE employees and consultants are currently planning revisions and developments of the Everyday Mathematics curriculum. In this seminar, the assessment working group will share current plans for the Assessment Intervention System that is set to launch in January of 2012 for the Common Core State Standards Edition of Everyday Mathematics. The group will summarize input on assessment from the District Advisory Group and other sources. This session will conclude with a focus group-type discussion, allowing participants to share ideas for Everyday Mathematics assessment offerings for the Fourth Edition.

Friday, July 15, 2011 at 12:30 pm

CEMSE Science Companion Team: Science Companion Technology Enhancement Project

Meaningful, student-centered technology usage is the next frontier of science curriculum development. Here we will present our work to make technology integral to Science Companion, an inquiry-based elementary science curriculum, including the framework we created for designing technology activities that support and enhance student inquiry in 17 different Science Companion units. We will also share findings from our partnership with Arlington Heights (Illinois) District 25, where 10 teacher "TECHsperts" piloted technology-enhanced units in their classrooms this spring. We will also provide an opportunity for the audience to experience some of our technology activities.

CEMSE Science Companion Technology Enhancement Team: Debbie Leslie, Liz Lehman, Meg Bates, Sarah Rand, Jen Hellige, Greg Burns-Leone, and Lucy Gray.

CEMSE EM Seminars Continue Wednesday, July 6, 2011 at 12:30 pm

  • Jul 8, 2011, 12:30pm

1225 E 60th Street, Room 304, Chicago, IL 60637

Lesson Components Working Group: Current State of Work

Several working groups made up of CEMSE employees and consultants are currently planning revisions and developments of the Everyday Mathematics (EM) curriculum. In this seminar, the lesson/program components working group will share its ideas about a number of issues, including incorporating the Common Core Standards for Mathematical Practices into lessons; addressing special needs populations (including ELL students, gifted students, struggling learners, and special education students); dealing with “bloat”; considering changes to the structure of lessons; and managing the various EM components. The group will also share its initial thoughts about building a digital version of EM.

Friday, July 8, 2011 at 12:30 pm
Katie Rich and Jim Flanders: Envisioning Everyday Mathematics as a Database

As the world of curriculum moves from print to digital, we need to consider different forms of digital curriculum. One way of envisioning a fully digital version of Everyday Mathematics (EM) is as a database of activities. In this seminar, we will summarize the discussions of this concept that have taken place within the EM development team and present a prototype of such a database. A discussion of issues to consider before building a full database will follow.

Katie Rich is an editor for the Everyday Mathematics program at CEMSE.

Jim Flanders is an author of the Everyday Mathematics program at CEMSE.

Seminars will take place in Room 304 of the CEMSE-UCSMP Center, 1225 East 60th Street, on the University of Chicago campus.

Contact: Center for Elementary Math Science Education
773-702-3921

Register for EM 2011 National Users' Conference

  • Aug 2, 2011,
  • Aug 3, 2011,
  • Aug 4, 2011,

Hilton Palmer House Hotel, Chicago, IL

The McGraw-Hill School Education Group, publisher of Everyday Mathematics, has announced the 2011 Everyday Mathematics National User’s Conference to be held August 2 through August 4. The meeting will be hosted in downtown Chicago at the historic Hilton Palmer House Hotel. This conference is designed for Everyday Mathematics educators and will feature Grades K through 6.

Participants will have an opportunity to participate in roundtable discussions with colleagues and authors. Training sessions will focus on your needs as teachers and administrators using Everyday Mathematics. Discuss the Common Core State Standards and their impact on curriculum and instruction. View demonstrations of classroom technology and discuss guidance for its use with Everyday Mathematics.

You can register on-line. If you have questions call or e-mail Darleen McGinnis at McGraw-Hill.

Darleen_Mcginnis@mcgraw-hill.com
Phone: 630-789-5263
FAX: 630-789-5264

Gartzman to speak on successful university – K12 partnerships

  • May 11, 2011,
  • May 12, 2011,

Washington, DC

Martin Gartzman, CEMSE Executive Director, will participate in a panel discussion of "Partnerships to Enhance STEM Education" at the National Research Council (NRC) workshop "STEM Education in K12 Schools." Gartzman will speak on successful university – K12 partnerships. The NRC workshop will be held May 11 and 12 in Washington, DC.

Presentation by CEMSE Staff at the American Educational Research Association Meeting

  • Apr 9, 2011,

New Orleans

On April 9, CEMSE staff members David Beer and Meg Bates presented the paper "Using Curriculum Research to Tailor Professional Development” at the 2011 annual meeting of the American Educational Research Association (AERA), held in New Orleans.

The paper’s authors are Beer, Bates, and Dae Kim, who is also a CEMSE staff member. The paper was based on research related to the development of virtual learning communities, which is funded by the National Science Foundation and on data gathered in Everyday Mathematics 3rd Edition lesson log studies funded by the Center.

From the Abstract:

"This paper describes how research on teachers' curriculum use can be used to consider teachers’ needs for professional development. Researchers and curriculum developers collaborated on a study in which over one hundred elementary teachers logged their enactment behaviors as they implemented the widely used K-6 curriculum Everyday Mathematics. Researchers found that these teachers emphasized segments of the lesson that involved teaching new material over segments that emphasized review and ongoing practice. They also found that teachers had trouble pacing lessons. Curriculum developers used these findings to plan future educative activities for Everyday Mathematics teachers. They determined that future professional development should focus on teachers’ curriculum knowledge, knowledge of how students learn mathematics, and knowledge of specific pedagogical strategies."

The text of the paper, handouts, and slide presentation can be viewed by following these links. The text will also be included in the AERA meeting online repository. Papers will be available in June 2011.

More News

May 6, 2016

Martin Gartzman Named Chair of NCTM Emerging Issues Committee

April 29, 2016

CEMSE’s Zalman Usiskin to Address the Metropolitan Mathematics Club on May 13, 2016

April 20, 2016

Engineering is Elementary Proposal is Finalist in Women’s Board Competition at the University of Chicago

April 5, 2016

CEMSE Staff Scheduled to Present This Month at AERA

April 5, 2016

UCSMP and CEMSE Authors and Staff Scheduled to Present This Month at NCSM/NCTM

March 17, 2016

THE SESAME PROGRAM for State of Illinois Endorsements in Middle Grade Mathematics and Middle Grade Science

March 17, 2016

Free Summer Math Courses for Teachers: University of Chicago Polk Bros. Mathematics Program

May 1, 2015

Highlights from CEMSE Staff Conference Presentations

April 13, 2015

CEMSE Featured on UChicago Website

April 8, 2015

Two Exciting New Projects from the Digital Curriculum Group

April 3, 2015

Free Summer Math Courses for Teachers: University of Chicago Polk Bros. Mathematics Program

April 3, 2015

Early Childhood STEM Working Group Convenes on March 12-13, 2015

April 3, 2015

“From the Classroom to the Lab and Back”: An Early Childhood Math Research Study

April 3, 2015

Outlier Research Group Updates

January 23, 2015

Upcoming MSPnet Academy Webinar Presentations

January 23, 2015

Jeanne Century Delivering a Keynote at the Upcoming STEM-C Partnerships: Computing Education for the 21st Century PI Meeting

January 21, 2015

UCSMP and CEMSE Authors speaking at MMC Conference

June 9, 2014

An Amazing Century: Where We Have Been and Where We Are Going

May 29, 2014

Outlier Expands Its Efforts to Improve Computer Science Education

April 23, 2014

Polk Brothers - University of Chicago Program in Mathematics for CPS Teachers Offered for Summer 2014

April 9, 2014

UCSMP-CEMSE authors presenting at NCSM and NCTM

March 24, 2014

Outlier Research Evaluation Receives NSF Grant to Study the Barriers and Supports to Implementing Computer Science

January 13, 2014

Paul Sally, first director of UCSMP, dies at age 80

October 30, 2013

CEMSE and UEI Release Major Study About K-12 Computer Science Education

October 11, 2013

Research and Evaluation Group Conducts Evaluation of TECH CORPS

October 24, 2013

October 24th Dinner Symposium for Illinois School Leaders

August 9, 2013

Purple Asparagus Evaluation Featured on Jamie Oliver's Blog

July 10, 2013

CEMSE's Research and Evaluation Team Featured in the American Evaluation Association Blog

May 16, 2013

Hanna Davis’s Data Visualization

April 8, 2013

University of Chicago Program in Mathematics for CPS Teachers: June 2013–June 2014

April 3, 2013

Enhancements for the Virtual Learning Community

March 21, 2013

Sarah Rand to Participate in Healthy School Seminar

March 12, 2013

Students’ Food Choices Evaluated With iPad App

February 28, 2013

Lach and Gartzman Participate in Webinar on Supporting High Quality Mathematics Instruction

February 19, 2013

Sarah Rand to be on Panel at the Good Food Festival

February 15, 2013

CEMSE to Create Skynet Junior Scholars Web Portal

February 8, 2013

Purple Asparagus App

January 31, 2013

Visualizing Data

January 16, 2013

LaForce Reviewing NSF Proposals

January 16, 2013

New Evaluation Projects

January 11, 2013

Jeanne Century and Sarah Rand to present at National Science Foundation's Computing Education for the 21st Century

September 4, 2012

Enrico Fermi Summer Intern Program

August 9, 2012

Everyday Mathematics featured in the Chicago Tribune

June 20, 2012

Two New Evaluation Projects: Zoo Explorers and Google CAPE

June 6, 2012

Century to Address LASER STEM Institute

June 4, 2012

Renewed Funding for the Teacher Leadership Project

June 4, 2012

Renewed Funding for the Teacher Leadership Project

May 7, 2012

Michael Lach, Director of STEM Policy and Strategic Initiatives, Appointed to National Research Council’s Board on Science Education

May 3, 2012

Case Study on UEI/CEMSE Improving Teacher Quality Project Published

May 3, 2012

Ohio STEM Network talks to Jeanne Century

May 25, 2012

Century and Bates Present Papers at the AERA Annual Meeting

May 24, 2012

CEMSE Staff Co-host NSF STEM Education Meeting in Chicago

May 14, 2012

AEA's Values - Walking the Talk with Maurice Samuels

April 27, 2012

Professor Usiskin Examines Singapore's High Test Scores

April 24, 2012

CEMSE and UCSMP Speakers at NCTM Conference

December 11, 2012

Professor Sally Receives ICTM Life Achievement Award

November 5, 2012

CEMSE Receives New NSF Grant to Expand STEM School Studies

November 1, 2012

CEMSE and UCSMP Contributions to the Study of Enacted Mathematics Curricula

October 8, 2012

Purple Asparagus’s Delicious Nutritious Adventures Program

January 31, 2013

CEMSE Executive Director to Join Discussion on Chicago School Reform

November 30, 2011

Response to SBAC's Review Draft of Content Specifications with Content Mapping for the Summative Assessment of the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics

November 29, 2011

Isaacs to Address Science Creativity Conference in Seoul, South Korea

November 11, 2011

UEI and CEMSE Establish University of Chicago STEM Project as Part of 100Kin10; Former Department of Education Staffer Michael Lach to Lead

October 5, 2011

Virtual Learning Community membership passes 1000 members

August 17, 2011

CEMSE Response to the PARCC Draft Model Content Frameworks for Mathematics

July 6, 2011

New Projects and a STEM Education Community on Researchers Without Borders

July 6, 2011

CEMSE Staff Support Science Outreach

June 14, 2011

Science Companion "TECHsperts"

June 14, 2011

CEMSE Awarded IES Research Grant

June 8, 2011

CEMSE Selects 2011 EM Summer Fellows

June 7, 2011

Possible R D Efforts in Chicago

June 7, 2011

Century on Fidelity of Implementation

May 6, 2011

Lehman coordinator for CPS committee on Instruction, Assessment, and Professional Community

May 6, 2011

Usiskin and Isaacs to discuss Common Core State Standards

May 6, 2011

Century spearheads development of draft guidelines for STEM education

May 6, 2011

Denise Porter and David Beer to head CEMSE's School Support Services

April 20, 2011

CEMSE meets with NSF Program Officers

April 14, 2011

Recent Presentations by CEMSE Staff

April 14, 2011

We've moved

April 14, 2011

New CEMSE Executive Director

April 14, 2011

Jeanne Century Honored

March 22, 2010

CEMSE Staff Authors Chapter in Book on Science Education Leadership

October 23, 2008

CEMSE Article in Science Educator

October 1, 2007

CEMSE Participates in Science Chicago

September 19, 2007

IBHE awards University grant to support Professional Development Schools

September 19, 2007

Everyday Mathematics Restructuring School Project enters its second year

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Past Events

  • Thu Jul 23

2015

Everyday Mathematics 4 New User Training - Grade 5 and 6

8:30am - 3:30am

  • Wed Jul 22

2015

Everyday Mathematics 4 New User Training - Grade 4

8:30am - 3:30am

  • Tue Jul 21

2015

Everyday Mathematics 4 New User Training - Grade 3

8:30am - 3:30am

  • Mon Jul 20

2015

Everyday Mathematics 4 New User Training - Grade 2

8:30am - 3:30am

  • Thu Jul 16

2015

Everyday Mathematics 4 New User Training - Grade 1

8:30am - 3:30am

  • Wed Jul 15

2015

Everyday Mathematics 4 New User Training - Kindergarten

8:30am - 3:30am

  • Tue May 12

2015

Communicating with Parents about the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics and the PARCC Mathematics Assessments: An “On the Table” Discussion

5:00pm - 7:00pm

  • Thu Aug 6

2015

Summer Everyday Math User's Conference - San Francisco

8:30am - 4:00pm

  • Mon Aug 3

2015

Summer Everyday Math User's Conference - Boston

8:30am - 4:00pm

  • Mon Jul 27

2015

Summer Everyday Math User's Conference - Chicago

8:30am - 4:00pm

  • Fri Apr 17

2015

CEMSE authors Gina Kling and Jennifer Bay-Williams presenting at NCTM

8:00am - 9:15am

  • Thu Apr 16

2015

CEMSE authors Andy Isaacs and Debbie Leslie presenting at NCTM

12:30pm - 1:30pm

  • Thu Apr 16

2015

CEMSE authors Gina Kling and Amanda Ruch presenting at NCTM

9:45am - 11:00am

  • Wed Apr 15

2015

CEMSE authors Alison Whittington, Ava Chatterjee, and Barbara Molina presenting at NCSM

2:15pm

  • Tue Apr 14

2015

CEMSE authors Zalman Usiskin and Meg Bates presenting at NCTM

10:00am - 11:15am

  • Tue Apr 14

2015

CEMSE authors Sara Burnworth, Eliza Bryant, Denise Porter, and Amanda Zimolzak presenting at NCSM

2:15pm

  • Tue Apr 14

2015

CEMSE authors Alison Whittington and Debbie Leslie presenting at NCSM

8:45am

  • Mon Apr 13

2015

CEMSE authors Alison Whittington and Amanda Zimolzak presenting at NCSM

1:30pm

  • Mon Apr 13

2015

CEMSE authors Katie Flores, Sisa Renie, and Denise Porter presenting at NCSM

12:15pm

  • Sat Apr 12

2014

CEMSE authors Amanda Ruch, Gina Kling, and Ellen Dairyko presenting at NCTM

9:45am-11:00am

  • Fri Apr 11

2014

CEMSE authors Andy Isaacs and Rebecca Maxcy presenting at NCTM

11:00am-12:00pm

  • Fri Apr 11

2014

CEMSE authors Liesje Spaepen, Katie Flores, and Amanda Ruch presenting at NCTM

9:45am-11:00am

  • Fri Apr 11

2014

CEMSE author Zalman Usiskin presenting at NCTM

9:30am-10:30m

  • Fri Apr 11

2014

CEMSE authors John Benson, Andy Carter, and Amanda Ruch presenting at NCTM

8:00am-9:15am

  • Thu Apr 10

2014

CEMSE authors Denise Porter and Rebecca Maxcy presenting at NCTM

3:30pm-4:30pm

  • Thu Apr 10

2014

UCSMP author Steve Viktora presenting at NCTM

2:00pm-3:00pm

  • Thu Apr 10

2014

CEMSE author Denisse Thompson presenting at NCTM

2:00pm-3:00pm

  • Thu Apr 10

2014

UCSMP author Nancy Powell presenting at NCTM

11:30am-12:00pm

  • Wed Apr 9

2014

CEMSE authors Denise Porter and Eliza Bryant presenting at NCSM

8:45am-9:45am

  • Wed Apr 9

2014

CEMSE authors including Denisse Thompson presenting at NCTM Research Conference

1:14pm-2:30pm

  • Tue Apr 8

2014

UCSMP author Steve Viktora presenting at NCSM

2:30pm-3:30pm

  • Tue Apr 8

2014

CEMSE authors Megan Schleppenbach-Bates and Cheryl Moran presenting at NCSM

10:00am-11:00am

  • Tue Apr 8

2014

CEMSE authors Alison Whittington and Denise Porter presenting at NCSM

8:45am-9:45am

  • Mon Apr 7

2014

CEMSE authors including Denisse Thompson presenting at NCTM Research Conference

5:45pm-6:45pm

  • Thu Oct 24

2013

October 24th Dinner Symposium for Illinois School Leaders

5:00pm-8:00pm

  • Fri Jan 18

2013

Panel on NSF Merit Review

4:30pm-5:30pm

  • Sat Feb 2

2013

Everyday Mathematics
New User Sessions

8:00am-3:00pm

  • Tue Jul 17

2012

Researchers Without Borders Webinar
What is a STEM School? How do STEM Schools Spread and Last?

1:00pm-2:00pm

  • Mon Jul 30
  • Tue Jul 31
  • Wed Aug 1

2012

Everyday Mathematics
2012 Everyday Mathematics National User Conference

  • Jul 30: 12:30pm-4:30pm
  • Jul 31: 8:30pm-4:30pm
  • Aug 1: 8:30pm-12:30pm
  • Mon Jul 16

2012

Everyday Mathematics
Summer Professional Development Workshops

8:00am-2:30pm CST

  • Sat Apr 21

2012

Everyday Mathematics
New-User Workshops

8:30am-2:00pm CST

  • Fri Apr 6

2012

CEMSE Seminar
Evaluation for Learning and Accountability

12:30-2:00pm CST

  • Tue Mar 6

2012

STEM Schools Webinar Series
Webinar 5: School Partnerships – K–12 Schools as Partners

3:00 - 4:00pm CST

  • Tue Feb 21

2012

STEM Schools Webinar Series
Webinar 4: School Partnerships – K–12 Schools and Institutions of Higher Education

3:00 - 4:00pm CST

  • Tue Feb 7

2012

STEM Schools Webinar Series
Webinar 3: School Partnerships – K-12 Schools and Community Organizations

3:00 - 4:30pm CST

  • Tue Jan 24

2012

STEM Schools Webinar Series
Webinar 2: School Partnerships – K-12 Schools and STEM Industry and Business

3:00 - 4:30pm CST

  • Wed Jan 11

2012

CEMSE Webinar
Using Everyday Mathematics to Support Implementation of the Common Core State Standards

4:00pm CST

  • Tue Jan 10

2012

STEM Schools Webinar Series
School Partnerships: An Introduction

3:00pm-4:30pm CST

  • Wed Nov 16

2011

CEMSE Seminar: Ohio STEM Learning Network Study: Measuring Implementation, Spread, and Sustainability of STEM Innovations

12:00pm-1:00pm

  • Sat Nov 5

2011

Everyday Mathematics New-User Workshop Trainings Day 2

8:30am-2:00pm

  • Tue Nov 1

2011

STEM School Webinars
Webinar 3: Math, Engineering, Technology and Science Academy (METSA), Carrollton, TX the New Tech Network

3:00pm-4:00pm

  • Tue Oct 18

2011

STEM School Webinars
Webinar 2: What is a STEM School? Metro Early College High School, Columbus, OH

3:00pm-4:30pm

  • Mon Oct 3

2011

STEM School Webinars
Webinar 1: What is a STEM School? Introduction

3:00pm-4:30pm

  • Fri Oct 28

2011

CEMSE Seminar: Re-thinking Teacher Evaluation

12:00pm-1:00pm

  • Fri Aug 26

2011

CEMSE EM Seminars
August 26: EM CCSS Edition Technology, Part 2

12:30pm

  • Wed Aug 17
  • Fri Aug 19

2011

CEMSE EM Seminars
Aug 17: EM CCSS Edition Technology
Aug 19: What will it look like in the classroom, and how will students be assessed?

  • Aug 17: 12:30pm
  • Aug 19: 12:30pm
  • Wed Aug 10

2011

CEMSE EM Seminars
Aug 10: Analyzing the Demands on and Supports for Teachers in Elementary Mathematics Curricula

12:30pm

  • Wed Aug 3
  • Fri Aug 5

2011

CEMSE EM Seminars
Aug 3: How do math curricula communicate with teachers?
Aug 5: Common Core Standards treatment of measurement

  • Aug 3: 12:30pm
  • Aug 5: 12:30pm
  • Wed Jul 27
  • Fri Jul 29

2011

CEMSE EM Seminars
July 27: Trajectories and Spatial Ability
July 29: Mathematical Understanding

  • Jul 27: 12:30pm
  • Jul 29: 12:30pm
  • Wed Jul 20
  • Fri Jul 22

2011

CEMSE EM Seminars
July 20: Examine Teachers' Virtual Learning Community
July 22: The Structure of Math Problems

  • Jul 20: 12:30pm
  • Jul 22: 12:30
  • Tue Aug 9
  • Wed Aug 10
  • Thu Aug 11

2011

Everyday Mathematics New-User Workshops

  • Aug 9: 8:00am
  • Aug 10: 8:00am
  • Aug 11: 8:00am
  • Wed Jul 13
  • Fri Jul 15

2011

CEMSE EM Seminars Continue

  • Jul 13: 12:30pm
  • Jul 15: 12:30pm
  • Fri Jul 8

2011

CEMSE EM Seminars Continue Wednesday, July 6, 2011 at 12:30 pm

12:30pm

  • Tue Aug 2
  • Wed Aug 3
  • Thu Aug 4

2011

Register for EM 2011 National Users' Conference

  • Aug 2:
  • Aug 3:
  • Aug 4:
  • Wed May 11
  • Thu May 12

2011

Gartzman to speak on successful university – K12 partnerships

  • May 11:
  • May 12:
  • Sat Apr 9

2011

Presentation by CEMSE Staff at the American Educational Research Association Meeting

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